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halliedog

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About halliedog

  • Birthday 05/29/1967

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Akron OH USA
  • Handicap:
    6.6
  1. Everything was purchased off eBay, except the ST driver head that I got from a generous WRX member for $125 shipped with headcover.
  2. Also should add, I wanted to play the GT shorter than normal and didn't find extra weights available. I went to Mizunousa.com, did the chat with Lauren, and got my extra weights in the mail today for grand total of FREE. Mizuno CS is second to none!
  3. Sorry to bump this thread back up from almost a year ago, but I just discovered these (GT180 and ST180) both in drivers and fairways. I have been playing a '17 M1 for a few years and mostly happy with it. On a lark decided I needed to try one of the new Mizuno 190 models. Read some reviews, and decided not to pay $400-500 on a club that might not preform better than what I have (no one locally has Mizuno wood demos, so would be going in blind). Then along comes the GT180 @ $125 for the head/adapter only and I figure why not. I figured if I was going in blind on the head might as well go in blind on the shaft. Bought an Even Flow White 6.0 70g, and have hit some of the best drives in recent memory! Then figured I might be leaving some distance on the table with spin, so promptly bought a ST180 head to pair up with the Even Flow. The ST180 is definitely lower spinning/launching, but the GT180 produces better feel and results for me as of now (no roll so carry is King!) Being the true ho, decided if I liked the GT180 driver, I'd be stupid to not try the fairway. I now have one of each (GT and ST) in the mail to do live test. GT has a Tensei White 70 and ST has a Tensei Blue 60, so I can swap/experiment, or just buy another Even Flow White to test both heads? Guess the reason for bumping this up is to say, don't sleep on these clubs! I think all in, I have $125 for each driver head, $105 for the new shaft, and $100 for each 3 wd with shaft. That puts me for $555 total as of now, and can sell off the heads that don't make the cut.
  4. I just bought a new O Works 7S and wanted to lengthen it, but instead of just adding an extension I bought a KBS C-Taper X flex iron shaft. Figured it could possibly be a similar solution as probably heavier and more "stable" than standard putter shaft. I put an 8" section of foam backer rod in to help dampen vibration. I've never been able to demo one of the Stability shafts yet, so can't compare, but so far I'm liking the feel on my little experiment. Unfortunately going to be a while before I get a chance to roll it on a real green, but loving it while carpet putting in the basement.
  5. Thanks so much! I got the 8" from Golfworks Q&A section, and I got the 140g X flex so I guess I could gp 8.25" and be safe. I'm wanting the putter to play somewhere in the 38" range and it's a 43" blank so won't need to go quite that far! Trying to build a "Tank", since Odyssey doesn't make the 7S in a Tank variant. I've got some 25g weights to bring the head weight up to 380g and going to put a SS Mid-Slim 2.0 with countercore on it.
  6. Whatever type of "Black Oxide" you are using is really too thick - covering all the milling on the face, and way too glossy. Looks more like Black Nitriding or PVD to me, but I'm open to you educating me?
  7. I've read elsewhere the parallel tip section of KBS C Taper is 8". I don't have a micrometer handy, can anyone weigh in? I'm trying to make a putter shaft as stiff as possible but don't want to tip trim so much that it won't fit on the putter post. It is an Odyssey O Works 7S , and from everything I've gathered it's a .370 to go over the post.
  8. If pulling from iron heads, I'd definitely agree with buying or building a puller, or just pay a local shop to do the job. If trying to pull a Driver/FW adapter, I've had pretty good success with this method: Securely clamp shaft horizontally. Remove club head from adapter, and then replace the screw from bottom of club head back into adapter, but not fully tightened. Attach a small vise-grip to the screw. Use a micro-torch to QUICKLY get the adapter heated to the point where the epoxy bond breaks. Pull adapter off using the vise-grips in as straight of a motion, in the same line as the shaft, with as little twisting as possible. Two things that are important to this method having any chance of consistent success - 1. By not tightening the adapter screw all the way, and attaching your vise-grips/pliers to it, you can get away with some "MINOR" twisting as the screw will take the brunt of the twisting, not the adapter/shaft. Still very important to go in straight line with shaft to avoid bending. 2. I use a torch only, never a heat gun for graphite. You want to concentrate the heat only where needed and get the epoxy to break down as fast as possible so the heat doesn't dissipate into the shaft causing the resins to soften/break down. I'm not recommending this on a super expensive shaft, but has always worked for me in a pinch on a shaft I just want to move from one adapter to another in a hurry and not too concerned about damage. Use at your own risk!
  9. Sorry, I can't seem how to quote and reply without replying in the same quote. I'll get it figured out so this is much more readable!
  10. Also, as far as I know, the TM wedges aren't a true bore through, even though they do have a red "plug" on the bottom making them appear so? I've never owned or even held any of them so can't say for sure, but think that's correct?
  11. Very late 80's or most likely very early 90's. Was around about the same time frame as the HT Tour, HT Distance, and HT Balata (I believed played by a young Fred Couples, Hal Sutton, etc.). Wasn't a bad ball, but the HTs were the Holy Grail for serious golfers not playing Titleist at the time. The Hts were the precursor the the wound Urethane Revolutions, which in my opinion were the some of the best feeling and performing balls of all time. The Revolutions were "the Pro V" before Titleist got into urethane, and once they did the rest is history - 2 piece distance with balata spin with surlyn durability.
  12. Not sure if they're still around, but used to be an online place called Club Finders (or something similar). As name suggests, specialized in replacing single irons lost/broken from sets. Somewhat pricey if I recall, but what are you gonna do if you need that odd 8 iron from an older set?
  13. Callaway: Original Big Bertha C4 Hyper X Tour Cobra: Fly Z+ Ping: TiSI Tec G25 Titleist: Pro Trajectory Metals PT 8.5 975 907 D1 910 D3 Wilson: Deep Red Taylormade: Pittsburgh Persimmon Burner Bubble r7 Superquad r9 Superdeep Tour Burner SLDR r15 430 (now awaiting shipment of '17 M1 440) Tough to remember some of those, had to use other people's lists as cheat sheets. Would be neat if there was a database of every model produced by various OEMs in chronological order.
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