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deejaid

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deejaid last won the day on October 8

deejaid had the most liked content!

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About deejaid

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    GRANDMASTER SPY

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  • Location
    California
  • Interests
    Golf, Guitars, and Traditional Woodworking
  • EBAY ID:
    dee-jaid

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  1. I agree with all the above so far. I’d like to see some smaller equipment companies like Wishon and Maltby be evaluated. You could even select a first time club builder and have them document who hard or easy it is to build your own. I’m sure many here have never done it but would be interested in trying or seeing another beginner give it a whirl. I also agree with more definitive timelines for reviews. I’ve lost a lot of interest in the reviews because stage 1 is just a “thanks for the opportunity, I play twice a week.....” and then we never know when there will be a follow-up or stage 2. I’d also say let’s see more tests of new equipment vs. 3, 5, or even 10 year old equipment. See if the upgrade is really worth it. And how about a classic golf section for me, Stu, and Nifty? [emoji16] Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  2. deejaid

    Weed & sons

    I see what you did there. [emoji6] Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  3. deejaid

    Weed & sons

    As a regular user of cannabis that has children I have a few thoughts. First, ask your son why he is using marijuana. Is it because his friends do it? Is it for an escape from problems he may be having. Really listen to what he has to say, it may be eye opening. Next, go online with him and research the positive and negative aspects of marijuana use and discuss with him. While cannabis has many wonderful healing properties, it does also impair functions that could prevent your son from finishing chores or schoolwork, and once he has a drivers license, can be dangerous. Then finally tell him that you don’t think it is good for someone that is still developing to be using a substance that can alter them. There are reasons for age limits and they must be obeyed for his safety. Once he is of a mature age he can then choose what substances to put into his body, but it is your duty to help him make those decisions while he lives at home. Be open and honest and loving. But most of all, don’t just talk, listen. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  4. deejaid

    Why have so many left this great game?

    Why have so many left? Death. The guys that were playing during the 70’s and 80’s are now in their 70’s or 80’s or in the ground. But, shouldn’t the next generation of middle age men have taken their place? Theoretically yes, but men of my generation spend much more time with their families, probably because many of us were latchkey kids while dad was out golfing. Now you older fathers out there please don’t take offense, but the fatherhood role has evolved over the last 40 years. How many men were members of men’s clubs like Rotary or some sort of lodge 40 years ago? Now, how many 40 year old men are joining those same organizations today? I play a hell of a lot less golf than my father did at my age. I’m hoping because of that my relationship with my daughters will be strong when they are adults, and not the twice a year phone calls my dad and I have. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  5. My buddy and I got paired with Hal Sutton at The Bridges in San Ramon in 2001 or so. He said his name was “Chris” as I’m sure he didn’t want to let on who he was, but it was definitely him. It was the most embarrassing round of my life too as I played like absolute garbage while “Chris” easily shot under par. I wouldn’t say he was very interesting either. He was pretty quiet and went about his business dismantling the course. I think he was more interested in me actually as he thought it was cool that I worked as a professional gambler at that time. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  6. deejaid

    Technology is amazing, but...

    The upright lies have nothing to do with taller players. Most amateurs can’t get their swing on the proper plane and come over the top. Karsten Solheim not only made clubs more forgiving by perimeter weighting, he also accomplished it by fitting players into more upright lies which helped eliminate their slice. If players learned a flatter swing plane OEM’s would make clubs like that. But they realize most people are lazy and are going to put the least amount of work into getting in the proper swing plane and instead expect the clubs to “forgive” their lack of ability. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  7. deejaid

    Biggest (not so big) Names in Irons

    I like my Hogan Ft. Worths. As a kid growing up playing flat soled, sharp leading edge blades on less than ideal courses, my miss I was most concerned with was hitting it fat, which means many times I’d be afraid to hit down and would hit it thin. The Hogan V-Sole is really an outstanding design and has eliminated my fear of the fat shot. I don’t think I’ll play anything other than a V-sole iron (Srixon and Cleveland have both caught my eye) ever again. It just so happens that Srixon, Cleveland, and Ben Hogan are those not as big companies that make outstanding equipment. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  8. Haha! That’s too funny. I’m checking out their site now. Some really nice looking irons on there. Looks like you’ll be getting a quality set of irons that no one else has in their bag. I like that. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  9. Personally, I’d say last 15 years. I immediately thought of the Taylormade 300 Forged Irons. They do look very nice though. And all the options sound great. Hopefully they can make a go of it. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  10. deejaid

    Causes of Slow Play

    I have a radical idea. How about the Pro Shop issues you balls based on the tees you are planning on playing? Playing the front tees? You get 9 balls. Middle tees? 6 balls. Back tees? 3 balls. Lose all your balls and you are done for the day. I’m sure people would play the proper tees then[emoji16] Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
  11. deejaid

    Causes of Slow Play

    1. Alcohol. Are people on a golf course to play a game of skill, or to get wasted? It’s amazing how much money people will spend on golf club technology to improve their game, only to go to the course and down a beer every other hole. How can you put you best swing on the ball if you are drinking alcohol? Any technological gain made with that brand new club is surely lost by the impaired motor skills due to alcohol consumption. Let me ask the guys that have been around the game awhile, meaning playing in the 1950’s-1980’s. When did drinking during the round start? I grew up playing in PA in the 1980’s and even my alcoholic father waited until after the round to drink. I don’t remember there being any cart girls. 2. Distance. The solid modern golf ball and massive oversized drivers have caused new courses to be built ridiculously long. Amateurs then think because they can once in a blue moon hit it 300 yards with that driver that they need to play the tips. The other problem is that 300 yards might be two fairways over. The further the ball goes, the further it goes offline. Now, add in cart golf with two drunken fools driving back and forth across the fairway and you have the perfect recipe for the 5 hour round. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  12. deejaid

    Technology is amazing, but...

    Familiarity and confidence beats technology every time. If you are standing in the middle of the fairway with a club you’ve hit 5,000 times you have a better chance of sticking it close than you do with the newest, latest technological wonder you bought last week. Doesn’t matter how much “better”, “longer” or “more forgiving” it is. Now, on the flip side, many people feel much more confident knowing they have the newest, most forgiving, longest club money can buy in their hand. If that is what gives them the confidence to make that same shot, that’s great too. I put my Hogan’s in the bag in spring and have been playing and practicing more since joining my club. Because I’ve been able to work on my game more my confidence has grown and I am becoming intimately familiar with how my clubs perform. I am not interested in the latest and greatest, I am interested in making these clubs do exactly what I want on demand. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  13. deejaid

    Ditching the Hybrid

    This might really be a space in the bag where real wood woods can excel. A heavy wood head can help you stay down whether through the rough or fairway. Modern fairway woods and hybrids are just stainless steel. Pretty much no different than the early small head metalwoods of the 1980’s. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  14. deejaid

    Ditching the Hybrid

    Mine is probably late 1950’s, pre-Ginty. Part of a 1,2,3,4 set. I don’t have the 2 wood in the bag though. Those Ginty’s look like they would be great out of the rough but might be a bit tough from tight lies. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  15. deejaid

    Ditching the Hybrid

    Now that I put the Stan Thompson’s in my bag I’m having even better results. I’m not sure the loft but the 4-wood is backweighted with lead and the ball gets way up in the air. 215 yards with a nice steep landing that holds the green. Better than any hybrid I’ve ever tried. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
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