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Motoboss

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  1. It’s worth experimenting with different combinations. Please post your findings.
  2. @Clemsonfan my findings are the same as yours and the article. Yes lighter toe weight the slower the face closed. I tended to pull short putts left but finally, finally settled on even weight. Go figure! I believe my biggest issue was creating hook spin in my stroke as I found it got worse or lessened with changing the toe weighting but still remained. I switched to as little weight as a I have, 3.5grams both toe and heel which effectively lowered the overall putter weight. I also changed from a Super Stroke 2.0 to a Ping 58 mid cord grip. With the lighter weight evenly distributed and the smaller grip I found much better feel for the putterhead. Consequently my line and distance control has immensely improved. The 18+ foot lags and the midrange 3-7 footer makes have improved tremendously . Additionally the 2-3 footers are just about automatic. Now these results are after garage matt putting and two rounds but I’ve quickly gained at least 4 strokes putting on the course. I can only hope it improves
  3. That is my point exactly. Nowadays it seems any opposition to any one’s behavior your deemed to be in the “get off my lawn” crowd. I guess with the steel spike conversation we’re showing our years.
  4. If you can access a course, or a convenient practice facility (not a driving range) as suggested pace off your yardage, get a retriever shag bag, decent balls and hit balls. Working on 100 yards in and less is a great learning tool. Once confident with short yardages the driving range for longer clubs become more relevant as your dependent on the range markers for distances. I used to use five gallon buckets at my predetermined distances to focus trying to put a ball in the bucket. Sure helped on the course with visualization.
  5. Ahhhh, nothing better than the ‘ole metal spike spin and pivot ball retrieval drag marks right in your line!
  6. I’m not particularly complaining about the manner of dress. I remember being turned away from courses years ago for not having a collared golf shirt. Clubs denying access based on dress has always equated to perceived values and manners. I’m referring to Golf Etiquette and, yes tradition. The prevailing “I don’t care what you do” attitude is now equated to turning a blind eye to the reason’s some of us play golf. As example the First Tee commercials promoting manners, truth, honesty and self control as a foundation for growing the game and for living your life. In golf these principles are based on tradition and meant as a way to help newcomers grow mentally and emotionally while respecting others around you as you learn the game. Turn a blind eye to the erosion of etiquette, manners, civility and tradition you might as well play soccer. Personally what someone wears is fine because there is no “style” in today’s younger generation anyway. Just wait for the days of shirtless, flip flop wearing man bun wanting to play thru your group because they ran out of beer What I do have a problem with is when some shouting, loudly cursing drunk is unabashedly pissing openly in a community golf course all the while blasting fouled mouthed rap on their mini boom box thinking they are Arnold Palmer. But for some that’s just a tradition. I do apologize for dragging this thread off course.
  7. Rolled up on a twosome AT the T box on the back nine dressed in their hipster gear, hoodies and shants, drinking their own brought in beers and while waiting on the group in front of them to clear the green on a par four were pissing on the cart path. Yeah I said bring back some decorum. This is the result of the “I don’t care what you do” attitude. Oh, and then while riding around in circles for several holes came up on seventeen to see if we had picked up one of their lost irons.
  8. Agreed. I play to a number then use the club that gives me that distance (within two or three yards) with no consideration for roll out. You get into hitting for roll out there are too many variables you can’t account for or control.
  9. The elimination of steel spikes were at the discretion of the golf clubs which everyone gleefully jumped onboard with as well as shoe manufacturer’s. As stated it was due to turf, clubhouse and infrastructure damage. The cost of maintenance in and around clubhouse has been greatly reduced if not eliminated all together due to spike damage. The idea of eliminating soft spikes won’t happen, at least in the next 25 years. Making everyone wear (worn down) spikeless or tennis shoes would result in ongoing never ending litigation due to personal injury. The first time someone falls down a dew covered tee box and breaks a wrist, dislocates an elbow or shreds a knee the clubs would forever be in court. Not to say the change can’t happen but it would be a slow, voluntary shift, as was the move to spikeless. I do miss the click clack of the steel spikes and never had a better “push” move with my back foot! Now if they’d just outlaw those short, ankle hugging sweat pants Justin Thomas is wearing we would return to some sort of decorum. It’s embarrassing.
  10. Great experiment. In the article I linked it states a “reduction of hook spin” with more toe weight but a slower closing toe. I have always associated slower toe closure to a more even, straighter stroke. I’ve been using 10g in the heel and a. 3.5g in the toe and recently found in my last round I was missing several short’ish putts, to the left, not really a pull but just missing left. I now wonder if it is due to “hook spin”? My next experiment will be with a heavier toe weight to ruduce the “hook spin” but fear “pulling “ the putt.
  11. Posted just now I have been using a new PING Vault 2 Anser Dale putter, total 350g with removable 10g head weights and Ping 58 Midsize Cord grip. Moved from an original 1968 Anser as I felt the need for more weight in the putter head and wanted to try some newer technology. After a few rounds I love the new putter but now have gone down the rabbit hole of “preferred” or “precise” weighting for my stroke. Trying to eliminate pushes or pulls to gain a consistent head location in a repeating stroke. I found a lighter toe weight diminishes left pull bias and after more investigation I found lighter head weight for better speed control, but seems to be counter intuitive but working. Still “tinkering “ with changeable weights trying to determine the best weight location (toe-v-heel) and actual weight in 3.5g, 5g, 10g and 20g increments. I am now at 3.5g toe and heel for an overall lighter weight. Looking for compatible head weight with excellent stroke feel. I ran across this article. Interesting information. Comparing Putter Weighting
  12. Still “tinkering “ with movable weights and trying to determine the best weight location(toe-v-heel) and actual weight with 5g increments I ran across this article. Interesting information, especially about toe weighting and “hook spin”. Movable Weighting
  13. I have always had a “shoulder turn” putting stroke, never hand’sy. Near all my putters have a SS Mid Slim 2.0 as when they first came out they were “the thing”. I never liked the original Ping 58 or similar types as they are just too “skinny” which was an additional reason for the change to the SS grips. Shopping for a new putter I just bought a new Ping Vault Anser 2 Dale and it came with a Ping 58 Midsize cord. I was amazed at the feel and feedback I got! The midsize grips seem to give me more positive reinforcement per stroke and my putting has improved. Theres something to be said for “smaller” grips!
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