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Dave's Take: Jaybird Tarah Bluetooth Headphones

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Dave's Take: Jaybird Tarah Bluetooth Headphones

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The Jaybird Tarah headphones may have entry-level pricing, but they deliver great sound, especially when paired with the Jaybird app.

Jaybird is the Word

The Jaybird Tarah is the third pair of Jaybird Bluetooth headphones that I have taken through the review process, having previously reviewed the Jaybird X3 and Jaybird Run models. In both of the previous reviews, I was definitely impressed with the Jaybird products, especially since I had never even heard of the brand prior to the first review.

Well it’s been about a year since I published the Jaybird RUN review, and I am happy to say that those headphones, and the X3 headphones, continue to perform flawlessly. The Run headphones are a staple of my golf bag, and my son uses the X3s at the gym on a daily basis. Nothing better than your kid pilfering your cool stuff, huh?

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Unfortunately for the Tarah headphones that I am writing about today, the previous experiences have elevated my expectations for this new model. It’s sort of like being the third kid to go to a high school when both of your elder siblings were valedictorians. 

Although I understand that the Tarah's role is as Jaybird’s entry-level model, it still has some big shoes to fill.

Jaybird Tarah: IN THE BOX

  • TARAH Wireless Buds
  • Silicone Ear Gels: S/M/L
  • Cord Management Clips
  • Cord Shirt Clip
  • USB 2.0 Charging Cable + Charge Clip
  • Color: Nimbus-Gray/Jade
  • Price: $99.99

Comfort and Fit

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Since they are of similar construction, most of my comparisons ended up being between the Tarah and the X3 headphones. The Run headphones are kind of their own thing, and not really an appropriate direct comparison.

Anyway, like the X3 model, the Tarah headphones fit into your ears using a combination of silicone fins and ear inserts. The difference here is that while the X3s had separate fins and ear buds, the Tarah headphones come with the buds and fins fused into single units.

Obviously this is going to cut into the versatility of fitting a bit. No longer can you pair small buds with large fins, or something like that. You really now only have three fit options. Hopefully one will work. For me, medium ear gels worked just fine.

One thing that I really like about the new single-piece system is that the buds and fins are always in proper alignment with each other. Occasionally, the fins can twist out of place on the X3, and the Run, headphones. On the Tarah, this can’t happen since they are single piece units.

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Like the other Jaybird headphones, the Tarah headphones had no trouble staying in place through practice sessions on the range, or during workouts at the gym. Once I had the proper ear sock size, I just adjusted the cord a bit to secure them. After that, it was all about the music.

Ease of Use

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Pairing is immediate. Not only for the first time that I paired them with my phone, but also when I paired them to my iPad later for movie watching. Just press and hold the power button and they are discoverable. So easy.

The controls are very intuitive. Press +/- for volume control; hold them to skip songs. Nothing crazy here, which I like. They work like they should.

Like the other Jaybird headphones, the Tarah headphones have a microphone and can be used to make calls. That’s not really a primary use for me, but they did perform just fine during some test calls.

Sound Quality

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One of the things that I like about the Tarah and other in-ear headphones is that they block out a great deal of ambient noise when you insert them in your ear. They are not noise canceling, but they definitely block the noise.

The nice thing about this is that when outside noise is reduced, you can now hear your music at lower volume, saving your battery and maybe your ears as well. The Tarah headphones can still get plenty loud, but it’s not necessary.

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The sound out of the box was good, but had a bit of that small speaker feeling. Bass was pretty absent, and overall I was not that impressed. However, after pairing the headphones with the free MySound app, and tweaking the EQ sound profile to add more bass, my mind changed completely.

Once you adjust the setting on the app, the sound from the Tarah really blossoms. It was a huge difference. If you buy a pair of these, or any Jaybird headphones, the MySound app is a must use. You’ll be very pleased with the sound changing option and likely find an EQ mix that suits your style.

Battery

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The Jaybird Tarah only features a six-hour battery as opposed to the eight-hour battery found in the X3. This is likely going to cover any single-setting headphone need that I have, though it will probably require more frequent recharging than other models.

The cool thing is that the battery charges quickly. You can get an hour of play with only 10 minutes of charge.

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Like the Jaybird X3, charging the Tarah requires a special USB cord. If you are not prone to losing stuff, this is not likely a big deal. If you are one that spends hours searching for missing cables, then maybe you should order an extra cable.

Jaybird Tarah Headphones Review: Summary

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The Jaybird Tarah headphones are solid entry-level Bluetooth headphones. For $99, you get a lightweight, easy to use, and great sounding headphones. If you need more fit versatility, then you can go to the X4 model. If you want a longer battery life, you can go to the newly released Tarah Pro with a 14 hour battery!

I think that the Jaybird Run headphones will still be my go to headphones for the driving range, because of the charging case, but for most other applications, I’m going Tarah.

Find out more at the Jaybird website, and at Amazon.

 

Detailed Specifications: Jaybird Tarah

AUDIO

  • Type: In-ear style
  • Noise-isolation: Passive
  • Impedance: 16 Ohm
  • Speaker sensitivity: 99 +/- 3dB at 1KHz
  • Output max. 10mW RMS (with level limit)
  • Total harmonic distortion <5% (1KHz, 1mW)
  • Audio format: 16-bit stereo
  • Codec: Bluetooth SBC implementation
  • Response bandwidth: 20Hz - 20kHz
  • Driver size: 6 mm

BLUETOOTH

  • Bluetooth version: 5.0
  • Frequency band: 2.4 GHz
  • Profiles: Handsfree , Headset , A2DP , AVCRP , SPP
  • Wireless range: Class 2 standard range 10m/33ft

INTEGRATED MICROPHONE

  • Type: MEMS, omni directional
  • Sensitivity: -38dB +/- 1dB (Test conditions: 1KHz, 0db = 1V/Pa)
  • COMPATIBLE PRODUCTS
  • Any Bluetooth device with HFP, HSP and A2DP

WEIGHT & DIMENSIONS

  • Headset: 528mm x 13.25mm x 23.6mm
  • Controller: 45.7mm x 11.7mm x 5.6mm
  • Charger: 112mm x 33.6mm x 7.2mm
  • Weight of headphones (without ear gel): 13.85g
  • Weight of charger: 6.5g

BATTERY

  • Play time: 6 Hrs*
  • Charging time: 2+ Hrs
  • Quick charge: 10 min = 1+ hour playtime
  • Charging: Via USB charging cable with Pogo pin connector
  • Input power: DC 5V 1A
  • Type: Lithium Ion
  • Battery voltage: 3.8V
  • Energy voltage in watt hrs per battery: 0.2wh
  • *May vary dependent on usage, device & aging

 

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Great stuff, Dave. So sound quality remains the same and the only stuff that is sacrificed is 2 hrs of battery time and some fit customization?

Seems like a great deal

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2 minutes ago, jlukes said:

Great stuff, Dave. So sound quality remains the same and the only stuff that is sacrificed is 2 hrs of battery time and some fit customization?

Seems like a great deal

Pretty much. If the fit and battery are an issue then I would say spend $30 more and go with the X4 model. Otherwise these are solid. I'll post any durability discoveries should they arise through extended usage.

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Pretty much. If the fit and battery are an issue then I would say spend $30 more and go with the X4 model. Otherwise these are solid. I'll post any durability discoveries should they arise through extended usage.

My wife and I are getting each other Powerbeats3 for Christmas Best Buy had them at half price for a pre black Friday deal. Otherwise we would have gone x4s  

 

 

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