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Edel Single Length Irons.


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The problem with a hosel weight bore is that it puts the weight higher in the heel of the club which may not be optimal for some players.  I didn't see it in reading about the Sterlings, but it sounds like they are using one of the Wishon S2S shafts for a build.  Yes, they are all the same weight, same balance point, etc., but there will be a point in the long irons where distance and trajectory will suffer. That's why they went to the hybrid.  I like the looks of the Sterlings though.

 

That's not why they went to the hybrid.  They added the hybrid due to swing speed.

 

TomWishon, on 20 November 2016 - 05:24 PM, said:

snapback.pngDanMurry, on 20 November 2016 - 04:15 PM, said:

Hi, I am new to golf and am interested in the Sterling clubs. I really love the concept and am willing to buy anything that can make golf easier. I would like to know if they are suitable for beginners. I had a guy at the golf club tell me I would not have the swing speed required to get the long irons off the ground. He had never tried single length clubs, he just believed they could be used by pros but not great of beginners such as myself.

 

I would also like to know how forgiving the Sterling clubs are. Are the Cobra F7 SL likely to be more forgiving. What would be the difference between the Cobra F7 SL and the Sterling SL irons.

With ANY single length model, you do really have to watch the clubhead speed to know what the set makeup should be in the set.  For us with the Sterling, if the iron clubhead speed is 80mph or higher, then the set makeup for the golfer can be 5 iron to SW.   If the iron speed is 75mph to 80, then it's a maybe for the 5 iron depending on the golfer's ability to generate a decent shot height with his swing.   If the speed is under 75mph then we recommend no 5 iron, start the set with the 6 iron, and above that would come a hybrid of say, 23-24* at around 38" in length.

 

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The Edel SLS irons are custom built for each person, including the Paderson shaft in the way the filaments are wound.  So, the same shaft with the same weight will have varying flex and kick point depending on which club you are hitting.  That allows the clubs to feel and swing the same, but the low-lofted clubs will launch higher, and the high-lofted clubs will launch lower, and give you the proper gapping.  That's why they are so much more expensive.  If I were going to go with single length irons, the Edel would be my choice, because I believe they can be fit to my swing the best.  

 

This is absolutely the point I've been getting to. The GSL Podcast with David Edel is really enlightening when it comes to what matters in single length clubs.

 

StrokerAce, since I know you plan on gaming a set this season I would highly recommend giving it a listening. Really eye opening and I left that podcast feeling like the only single length option that makes any kind of sense right now (or is even feasible) are the Edels.

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This is absolutely the point I've been getting to. The GSL Podcast with David Edel is really enlightening when it comes to what matters in single length clubs.

 

StrokerAce, since I know you plan on gaming a set this season I would highly recommend giving it a listening. Really eye opening and I left that podcast feeling like the only single length option that makes any kind of sense right now (or is even feasible) are the Edels.

 

Okay...now I'm confused... if Edel is really the only thing that makes sense why isn't Bryson D using them?

Why'd he go with Cobra forged?  Is it just money from the sponsorship?  Do you think he'd go back to Edel if they paid him close to what Cobra was?

 

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That's not why they went to the hybrid.  They added the hybrid due to swing speed.

 

TomWishon, on 20 November 2016 - 05:24 PM, said:

snapback.pngDanMurry, on 20 November 2016 - 04:15 PM, said:

Hi, I am new to golf and am interested in the Sterling clubs. I really love the concept and am willing to buy anything that can make golf easier. I would like to know if they are suitable for beginners. I had a guy at the golf club tell me I would not have the swing speed required to get the long irons off the ground. He had never tried single length clubs, he just believed they could be used by pros but not great of beginners such as myself.

 

I would also like to know how forgiving the Sterling clubs are. Are the Cobra F7 SL likely to be more forgiving. What would be the difference between the Cobra F7 SL and the Sterling SL irons.

With ANY single length model, you do really have to watch the clubhead speed to know what the set makeup should be in the set.  For us with the Sterling, if the iron clubhead speed is 80mph or higher, then the set makeup for the golfer can be 5 iron to SW.   If the iron speed is 75mph to 80, then it's a maybe for the 5 iron depending on the golfer's ability to generate a decent shot height with his swing.   If the speed is under 75mph then we recommend no 5 iron, start the set with the 6 iron, and above that would come a hybrid of say, 23-24* at around 38" in length.

 

Yes, and that is why the Edel doesn't have to go with a hybrid.  They can build 3-4 irons that fly higher because the shaft can be built specifically for that while maintaining the same swingweight.

 

And yes, Bryson went with Cobra because of the $$$$$$$.  I would be willing to bet that the Cobras that he is playing are nothing like the OTR single length clubs that Cobra is selling.

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Yes, and that is why the Edel doesn't have to go with a hybrid. They can build 3-4 irons that fly higher because the shaft can be built specifically for that while maintaining the same swingweight.

 

And yes, Bryson went with Cobra because of the $$$$$$$. I would be willing to bet that the Cobras that he is playing are nothing like the OTR single length clubs that Cobra is selling.

Exactly. Off the rack and what Bryson has available to him are NOWHERE close to each other. They can't be. Bryson took the money and ran with it. Can't blame him for that.
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Is the cost of the Edel's worth it? Only you can make that determination. :

One thing I think about with clubs and price is considering what your typical club buying cycle is and if you can commit to keeping a more expensive set longer than your average cycle to make it cost neutral. I think I read the average golfer changes irons every 5 to 7 years (maybe more often in this forum?!?). For even numbers sake say you typically get new irons every 4 years and you are looking at clubs that cost twice as much than the average--ask yourself if you would be happy with playing the irons for twice as long as your typical cycle-8 yrs in this example. If the answer is yes, then it is cost neutral so go for it. If you don't trust the club ho in you and you know you'll get the itch after 4 yrs to get new sticks--then it is probably not worth it.

 

The risk with single length irons is that it is hard to tell if it is something one would like without playing them for an extended run. So the commitment gets a bit trickier.

 

PS: sorry if I am being an enabler to golf equipment addicts with my comments. And to their spouses.

 

 

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One thing I think about with clubs and price is considering what your typical club buying cycle is and if you can commit to keeping a more expensive set longer than your average cycle to make it cost neutral. I think I read the average golfer changes irons every 5 to 7 years (maybe more often in this forum?!?). For even numbers sake say you typically get new irons every 4 years and you are looking at clubs that cost twice as much than the average--ask yourself if you would be happy with playing the irons for twice as long as your typical cycle-8 yrs in this example. If the answer is yes, then it is cost neutral so go for it. If you don't trust the club ho in you and you know you'll get the itch after 4 yrs to get new sticks--then it is probably not worth it.

 

The risk with single length irons is that it is hard to tell if it is something one would like without playing them for an extended run. So the commitment gets a bit trickier.

 

PS: sorry if I am being an enabler to golf equipment addicts with my comments. And to their spouses.

 

 

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Fair enough.  I suppose you need to measure the opportunity cost and expected return from switching irons.  However, in some cases, if you've had a set of irons for a little while, got them off-the-rack, have reached a point of marginal returns and decide to finally get fit for a set, then how long can you expect to keep that set that was fit for your body, your swing - single length or progressive?  4/8/10/12 years?  Longer?

 

What becomes the motivation for switching irons?

 

If you've bought 'off-the-rack' and are ready for custom-fit then I can understand the switch, but after being custom-fit what's the advantage that you'd be gaining?  Is the opportunity cost lost - or gained - worth it?  That should be the question...  what am I giving up and what am I getting in return and is that worth not only the monetary cost but also the utility benefits...

 

For me - I've never been (properly) fit for any clubs; I've gone to demo days and stuff but that isn't what I consider a proper 1-on-1 fitting.  I've played pretty well with the off-the-rack-used-from-Callaway-preowned-set but I'm ready to invest in the next step.  My choice is either single length or progressive and I'm quite intrigued by the simplicity of the single length.

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Fair enough. I suppose you need to measure the opportunity cost and expected return from switching irons. However, in some cases, if you've had a set of irons for a little while, got them off-the-rack, have reached a point of marginal returns and decide to finally get fit for a set, then how long can you expect to keep that set that was fit for your body, your swing - single length or progressive? 4/8/10/12 years? Longer?

 

What becomes the motivation for switching irons?

 

If you've bought 'off-the-rack' and are ready for custom-fit then I can understand the switch, but after being custom-fit what's the advantage that you'd be gaining? Is the opportunity cost lost - or gained - worth it? That should be the question... what am I giving up and what am I getting in return and is that worth not only the monetary cost but also the utility benefits...

 

For me - I've never been (properly) fit for any clubs; I've gone to demo days and stuff but that isn't what I consider a proper 1-on-1 fitting. I've played pretty well with the off-the-rack-used-from-Callaway-preowned-set but I'm ready to invest in the next step. My choice is either single length or progressive and I'm quite intrigued by the simplicity of the single length.

All good thoughts here. Getting properly fit is a great first step, you won't regret it.

 

 

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Fair enough.  I suppose you need to measure the opportunity cost and expected return from switching irons.  However, in some cases, if you've had a set of irons for a little while, got them off-the-rack, have reached a point of marginal returns and decide to finally get fit for a set, then how long can you expect to keep that set that was fit for your body, your swing - single length or progressive?  4/8/10/12 years?  Longer?

 

What becomes the motivation for switching irons?

 

If you've bought 'off-the-rack' and are ready for custom-fit then I can understand the switch, but after being custom-fit what's the advantage that you'd be gaining?  Is the opportunity cost lost - or gained - worth it?  That should be the question...  what am I giving up and what am I getting in return and is that worth not only the monetary cost but also the utility benefits...

 

For me - I've never been (properly) fit for any clubs; I've gone to demo days and stuff but that isn't what I consider a proper 1-on-1 fitting.  I've played pretty well with the off-the-rack-used-from-Callaway-preowned-set but I'm ready to invest in the next step.  My choice is either single length or progressive and I'm quite intrigued by the simplicity of the single length.

I started playing golf 25 years ago at age 45.  The only "fitting" I have had was in 2012 for my Ping i20 irons.  I like them, and the only reason for me to change is if I want something shiny and new.   :)

 

Ten years ago I bought a set of used Macgregor VIP Tourney blades because they were pretty.  I played them for a while, but the stiff steel shaft was too much for me.  Last spring I reshafted them with UST ProForce graphite shafts and played them most of last summer.  I do like them, and hit them just as well as my Pings.  I went back to the Pings for my trip to AZ.

 

If the current single length irons were available when I had my fitting, I would probably have jumped on that bandwagon.  However, given my age and where I am at with my game, I really don't see me changing.  I suppose that could change if I ever get an opportunity to go through a true fitting and I see a real benefit.

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Fair enough.  I suppose you need to measure the opportunity cost and expected return from switching irons.  However, in some cases, if you've had a set of irons for a little while, got them off-the-rack, have reached a point of marginal returns and decide to finally get fit for a set, then how long can you expect to keep that set that was fit for your body, your swing - single length or progressive?  4/8/10/12 years?  Longer?

 

What becomes the motivation for switching irons?

 

If you've bought 'off-the-rack' and are ready for custom-fit then I can understand the switch, but after being custom-fit what's the advantage that you'd be gaining?  Is the opportunity cost lost - or gained - worth it?  That should be the question...  what am I giving up and what am I getting in return and is that worth not only the monetary cost but also the utility benefits...

 

For me - I've never been (properly) fit for any clubs; I've gone to demo days and stuff but that isn't what I consider a proper 1-on-1 fitting.  I've played pretty well with the off-the-rack-used-from-Callaway-preowned-set but I'm ready to invest in the next step.  My choice is either single length or progressive and I'm quite intrigued by the simplicity of the single length.

 

 

My answer to this question is simply changes in technology. While the OEM's want to push the envelope with marketing and constantly saying they've revolutionized the game there ARE improvements over a certain period of time. When those changes take place, it makes sense to consider having another fitting from top to bottom and reset the bag to the current standard.

 

That's my motivation for changing down the road.

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My answer to this question is simply changes in technology. While the OEM's want to push the envelope with marketing and constantly saying they've revolutionized the game there ARE improvements over a certain period of time. When those changes take place, it makes sense to consider having another fitting from top to bottom and reset the bag to the current standard.

 

That's my motivation for changing down the road.

 

Looking at your signature it appears that you had a change in most of your bag recently!  At least the driver/fairway woods & irons...

 

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That is correct.

 

I changed from a set of clubs that weren't matching my current needs (blades) to a set of clubs with better technology (cup face, Surefit CG, upgraded from SLDR 3W to the XR's) and kept my Edel wedges and putter. Had the wedges reshafted.

 

Why I did this is because I went on a bucket list trip to Modern Golf in Canada. I've wanted to make that trip for years and this year was my opportunity.

 

I went for a totally brand agnostic fitting planning to purchase only if there was proof of a significant increase in performance. Needless to say there was.

 

If you want to read more about it I have two very thorough and lengthy posts detailing this trip.

 

This is the highest quality set of clubs (configuration, build quality, etc) that I could buy for my game. I won't be making any equipment changes unless technology changes in the future or I damage something.

 

If you haven't read those posts, I recommend them. At the very least it gives you some insight into what a fully agnostic fitting can be like.

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  • 3 months later...

I went to get my lofts and lies adjusted on my irons a couple of weeks ago, and the guy was an Edel rep who would custom fit for their clubs. We got talking about the single length clubs a little bit (he is a big believer in the idea for the right type of golfer, but not a "This is the best thing for everyone" type of guy), and he made an interesting comment that he thought that anyone that wanted to play single length irons should only play graphite shafts, not steel. His comment was that the only type of player that could really be successful with a steel shafted, single length iron is tour pros, like Bryson, but average joe golfer wouldn't be as consistent and would struggle. What do you guys think about that, and if that is the case, is Cobra hurting the single length game as the only big OEM to have a mass offering but using steel shafts?

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Agree with Stroker here. Did he give an actual reason why. Or just saying his opinion.

 

I have hit the One Forged with a steel shaft and hit them fine. And my 17 HC wouldn't quite cut it on Tour 😎

 

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  • 2 months later...

I went to get my lofts and lies adjusted on my irons a couple of weeks ago, and the guy was an Edel rep who would custom fit for their clubs. We got talking about the single length clubs a little bit (he is a big believer in the idea for the right type of golfer, but not a "This is the best thing for everyone" type of guy), and he made an interesting comment that he thought that anyone that wanted to play single length irons should only play graphite shafts, not steel. His comment was that the only type of player that could really be successful with a steel shafted, single length iron is tour pros, like Bryson, but average joe golfer wouldn't be as consistent and would struggle. What do you guys think about that, and if that is the case, is Cobra hurting the single length game as the only big OEM to have a mass offering but using steel shafts?

I was able to speak directly with David Edel last week and it's not a matter of a "pro" being able to hit steel, it's a matter of getting the weighting and flex completely correct so that the ball, when hitting a 4 iron, flies like a four iron: height, length. Same with a 7 iron. Steel can't do this effectively because of the limitations of the steel shaft processing. Lastly, the Edel Single length shafts are not graphite.... They're a Kevlar-like woven material. Graphite ovals, this doesn't. Anyway, it doesn't sound like the rep understands what he's selling.

By-the-way, JB Holmes is playing the single length 3 iron. Wants to hit bullets, 250 yards... Not alone on tour.

 

 

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Has anyone on these forums done any extensive testing themselves with the single length irons? I'm just curious what their yardage gaps actually end up being, and if smaller odd yardage gaps are more playable than the currently large gaps? 

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  • 2 months later...

I'm still gaming mine. Starting the 7th month of using them. Gaps are better (especially in the short irons) than I've ever been able to maintain. Distances are also remaining steady, even though I'm averaging a round a month. Only issue I've had so far is with the 3 iron, on days where I haven't hit any balls, it's a stinger 4 iron. However, once I warm up, it's fine. I have recently pulled the SL SW from the bag. I hit it great around the green, from the bunker and with full swings, but I'm not currently practicing those half shots between 50-100 yards enough to rely on it under pressure. 

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Pulled the trigger on these 3 mos ago after being properly fit. These are staying.  I don't even glance at the new iron reviews.  I am a 10 index.  Some say the clubface is small, but in my case the proper fitting eliminated most toe/heel strikes.  Yes the wedges and upper irons fly higher but for my course that works.  Many greens used to be hard to hold. The four iron is lower trajectory but dead straight.  Every time.  My 7 wood flies higher and lands softer with a fade, but off the tee and setting approach distances on par 5's the SL Edel four iron is what I now use.  I have one 58 deg edel dgr wedge for scoring but just choke down on the SL SW for gaps and chipping.  The best part of the SL set for me is that misses right or left are almost non existent.  I am one full club longer with SL and that is what took some getting used to.  A quality product when properly fit.

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