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Collecting Putters and the Byron Morgan 006 LOL LN

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Call me Taneleer Tivan

Putter mix - 1.jpg

Before we take a look at the sweet putter that I have for you today, I thought that it would be interesting to explore the question of how does a golfer go from having one putter in his bag to having a hundred putters in his garage?

 

Crazy as that sounds, it is exactly what happened to me, and to more than a few other putter collectors out there. Somehow, we transitioned from needing a putter to play golf with to needing to have lots of putters.

 

How does this transition happen? I'll try answer that from my experiences, perhaps serving as a pathway, or a warning, for other would-be putter collectors.

 

I've Always Collected Stuff

Putter mix - 1.jpg

 

I was not really joking when I said that you should call me The Collector (Did you get that reference above?). When I think back on it, I've collected various things my entire life. Baseball cards, comic books, Star Wars action figures, beer coasters, and the list goes on from there. I think that for me, collecting is 20% value speculation, and 80% the hunt. I get a bit of a rush when I find something cool/rare.

 

I remember being super excited to open up a pack of Fleer NBA cards that had a Shaquille O'Neal limited edition Rejector card inside. Was certain that it would be worth a bunch of money eventually, not the 99¢ list price currently all over eBay. The thrill of acquisition definitely outpaced value on that one…

 

shaq.jpg

 

So I suppose that I had a predisposition to collecting before I ever started amassing putters. Without getting into my entire golf biography, I started playing “serious” golf late in life (age 39). By “serious” I mean that I took lessons, bought nice equipment, and overall cared more about how I played than I had during my previous drink beer and hit balls golfing escapades.

 

My first real putter was an Odyssey Rossie 2 that I received from my father-in-law as a Christmas gift. That putter probably started the cavalcade of flatsticks.

 

Once I became aware of the vast putter options out there, the constant putter well rotation became inevitable. The Rossie quickly became a Cleveland VP Milled #2, which then became a Scotty Cameron Circa 62 #1, and so on and so on. Lots and lots of putters have moved through my bag through the years. Understatement of the year right there.

 

Moving Off The Rack

Byron LOL006LN - 10.jpg

 

At some point, I became aware of the custom putter market. I can't remember the exact situation regarding how this happened, maybe it was when I found PutterTalk.com, but it was a mind blowing revelation. It was crazy to think that there were small shops out there making putters that were truly unique, most containing way more personality than those found in the golf shop, and at a price that was not much above off the rack retail pricing.

 

I had to have one.

 

I think that people order custom putters for two reasons. They either have very specific putter specifications that match their putting stroke, or they want a putter that is cool and unique. Sure, you can have both of those, but I can admit that my motivation for acquiring a small shop putter was the latter. I had no real clue about my stroke needs, but I definitely wanted something cool to putt with. Thus began my long-running love affair with the LOL longneck.


Byron Morgan 006 LN

Byron LOL006LN - 6.jpg

 

This Byron Morgan 006 putter that I have to share with you today was my first custom putter. Thing is, I didn't order it directly from Byron, so it wasn't custom to my specs, but as soon as I saw it, I needed to have it. Nothing that I had seen in a shop was even remotely similar.

 

When I think about the attraction, I think that it was the overall character of the putter that drew me in, and what keeps me a fan of small shop putters to this day.

 

Byron LOL006LN - 7.jpg

 

The most important thing about a custom putter for me is that you can see that a person made it, putting some of their life into the metal. Maybe that's a bit woo woo for a putter, but whenever I look at one of my Byron Morgan putters, I can envision Byron with a hammer adding the stamps, grinding away at the wheel, or torching the neck to be able to twist it.

 

Byron LOL006LN - 11.jpg

 

His hands were all over the making of this putter, and I appreciate that. Not all of the stamps are quite the same depth, and the position of the stamps is definitely organic, compared to a machine-driven engraver where everything is all squared up. You may not find the same variable aesthetics as pleasing, but I definitely value the feeling of connection to the person behind the putter.

 

I gamed this putter for almost a whole year, which some of you may recognize as being a labor worthy of Hercules. I own my putter philandering. Though it's a little heavy for my stroke, I still sneak the LOL LN out to the course here and there. It's just fun to roll balls with, and when I look at all of those smiley faces, how could I get angry about anything that happens on the green.

 

Byron LOL006LN - 4.jpg

 

Since acquiring the 006 LOL LN, I've ordered a few custom putters from Byron, and every time that I open up the box and see the putters for the first time I am amazed at what Byron has produced. Sure, I sent him the specs, and maybe some ideas about aesthetics, but Mr. Morgan is the one who breathes life into the metal.

 

As I write all of this, I can feel the urge to order another putter grow stronger and stronger. I know that I now need different putter spec than my previous Byron putters. I've even got a theme in mind. Perhaps it's time to send an email to Huntington Beach...

 
Any other putter collectors want to chime in on how you got started collecting?
 
Here are some bonus shots of the 006 LOL LN :)
Byron LOL006LN - 5.jpg
Byron LOL006LN - 8.jpg
Byron LOL006LN - 9.jpg
Byron LOL006LN - 12.jpg
 
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Call me Taneleer Tivan

attachicon.gifPutter mix - 1.jpg

Before we take a look at the sweet putter that I have for you today, I thought that it would be interesting to explore the question of how does a golfer go from having one putter in his bag to having a hundred putters in his garage?

 

Crazy as that sounds, it is exactly what happened to me, and to more than a few other putter collectors out there. Somehow, we transitioned from needing a putter to play golf with to needing to have lots of putters.

 

How does this transition happen? I'll try answer that from my experiences, perhaps serving as a pathway, or a warning, for other would-be putter collectors.

 

I've Always Collected Stuff

attachicon.gifPutter mix - 1.jpg

 

I was not really joking when I said that you should call me The Collector (Did you get that reference above?). When I think back on it, I've collected various things my entire life. Baseball cards, comic books, Star Wars action figures, beer coasters, and the list goes on from there. I think that for me, collecting is 20% value speculation, and 80% the hunt. I get a bit of a rush when I find something cool/rare.

 

I remember being super excited to open up a pack of Fleer NBA cards that had a Shaquille O'Neal limited edition Rejector card inside. Was certain that it would be worth a bunch of money eventually, not the 99¢ list price currently all over eBay. The thrill of acquisition definitely outpaced value on that one…

 

attachicon.gifshaq.jpg

 

So I suppose that I had a predisposition to collecting before I ever started amassing putters. Without getting into my entire golf biography, I started playing “serious” golf late in life (age 39). By “serious” I mean that I took lessons, bought nice equipment, and overall cared more about how I played than I had during my previous drink beer and hit balls golfing escapades.

 

My first real putter was an Odyssey Rossie 2 that I received from my father-in-law as a Christmas gift. That putter probably started the cavalcade of flatsticks.

 

Once I became aware of the vast putter options out there, the constant putter well rotation became inevitable. The Rossie quickly became a Cleveland VP Milled #2, which then became a Scotty Cameron Circa 62 #1, and so on and so on. Lots and lots of putters have moved through my bag through the years. Understatement of the year right there.

 

Moving Off The Rack

attachicon.gifByron LOL006LN - 10.jpg

 

At some point, I became aware of the custom putter market. I can't remember the exact situation regarding how this happened, maybe it was when I found PutterTalk.com, but it was a mind blowing revelation. It was crazy to think that there were small shops out there making putters that were truly unique, most containing way more personality than those found in the golf shop, and at a price that was not much above off the rack retail pricing.

 

I had to have one.

 

I think that people order custom putters for two reasons. They either have very specific putter specifications that match their putting stroke, or they want a putter that is cool and unique. Sure, you can have both of those, but I can admit that my motivation for acquiring a small shop putter was the latter. I had no real clue about my stroke needs, but I definitely wanted something cool to putt with. Thus began my long-running love affair with the LOL longneck.

 

Byron Morgan 006 LN

attachicon.gifByron LOL006LN - 6.jpg

 

This Byron Morgan 006 putter that I have to share with you today was my first custom putter. Thing is, I didn't order it directly from Byron, so it wasn't custom to my specs, but as soon as I saw it, I needed to have it. Nothing that I had seen in a shop was even remotely similar.

 

When I think about the attraction, I think that it was the overall character of the putter that drew me in, and what keeps me a fan of small shop putters to this day.

 

attachicon.gifByron LOL006LN - 7.jpg

 

The most important thing about a custom putter for me is that you can see that a person made it, putting some of their life into the metal. Maybe that's a bit woo woo for a putter, but whenever I look at one of my Byron Morgan putters, I can envision Byron with a hammer adding the stamps, grinding away at the wheel, or torching the neck to be able to twist it.

 

attachicon.gifByron LOL006LN - 11.jpg

 

His hands were all over the making of this putter, and I appreciate that. Not all of the stamps are quite the same depth, and the position of the stamps is definitely organic, compared to a machine-driven engraver where everything is all squared up. You may not find the same variable aesthetics as pleasing, but I definitely value the feeling of connection to the person behind the putter.

 

I gamed this putter for almost a whole year, which some of you may recognize as being a labor worthy of Hercules. I own my putter philandering. Though it's a little heavy for my stroke, I still sneak the LOL LN out to the course here and there. It's just fun to roll balls with, and when I look at all of those smiley faces, how could I get angry about anything that happens on the green.

 

attachicon.gifByron LOL006LN - 4.jpg

 

Since acquiring the 006 LOL LN, I've ordered a few custom putters from Byron, and every time that I open up the box and see the putters for the first time I am amazed at what Byron has produced. Sure, I sent him the specs, and maybe some ideas about aesthetics, but Mr. Morgan is the one who breathes life into the metal.

 

As I write all of this, I can feel the urge to order another putter grow stronger and stronger. I know that I now need different putter spec than my previous Byron putters. I've even got a theme in mind. Perhaps it's time to send an email to Huntington Beach...

 

Any other putter collectors want to chime in on how you got started collecting?

 

Here are some bonus shots of the 006 LOL LN :)

attachicon.gifByron LOL006LN - 5.jpg

attachicon.gifByron LOL006LN - 8.jpg

attachicon.gifByron LOL006LN - 9.jpg

attachicon.gifByron LOL006LN - 12.jpg

That's a beaut. I have room in my basement whenever you decide to lighten the load on some of these
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That's a beaut. I have room in my basement whenever you decide to lighten the load on some of these

Putters do sometimes leave the garage. I'll add you to the potential rehoming list ;)

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Nice collection! Years ago I went thru a “collecting putter phase”. Like you I had many great putters from great putter makers, Byron, T P Mills, Nead, Xenon, Tad Moore, Lamont, Bettenardi, etc. when I got close to 70 years old I just got disinterested and sold off just about all of them. I kinda miss them but moved on.

Thanks for sharing your collection and I'm looking forward to seeing more of what you have. Good luck and enjoy them.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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Aside from always making a post interesting and providing great accompanying photos.... you are a sick man Dave. LOL

 

There's a lot of posts put up by guys showing equipment but nothing tops the ones by Dave.

 

Great job!!!

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Aside from always making a post interesting and providing great accompanying photos.... you are a sick man Dave. LOL

 

There's a lot of posts put up by guys showing equipment but nothing tops the ones by Dave.

 

Great job!!!

Why thank you sir!

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GS Dave

I have a few leftover Putter covers from TP Mills, Xenon, Nead and a couple others I'm not sure of. If you're interested in them I can PM a pic. Not looking for anything maybe a trade. They're in a box in a garage.

 

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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That's a horrible collection. They are all wrong. Worthless to people in their right minds

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That's a horrible collection. They are all wrong. Worthless to people in their right minds

Silly southpaw sentiments

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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I have a Byron Channel Islands I had built.  Nice feel and looks good.  

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I was starting to have a handful of Scotty's pile up but I sold them off to have my friend make me a custom putter from his CNC.  

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I too have a small collection (41 putters) but all OTR and no customs yet! This year I've been thinking more and more about customs. I gamed a Ping Zing 5bz from 91-2016 and had a cpl more Pings laying around because that was,what I thought, the only game in town! My oldest brother,who was living in South Carolina at the time aguirred a Scotty Cameron from a Pro that won it in a tournament. When I first seen it I knew I had to have it! It is a Pro Platinum Laguna 2 and it looked brand new still! Well about a year later I had my chance. He kinda quit golfing and i kinda quit ice fishing and I came up with a proposition. I traded my gas powered ice augers for that Laguna and that's how it all started,a d it still looks brand new! I googled Scotty Cameron and a whole new world opened up! Enter "Ebay" here I come! My first purchase was a 2016 Bettinardi BB8 midnight black with neon green paint,WOW! It was the most beautiful thing I had ever seen! So I started collecting BB8s (I currently have 6 BB8s). Now I have Scottys,Bettys,Pirettis,Tad Moores and just about every OTR manufacturer there is.but no customs. Now I need to sell in order to afford a custom! That's a pickle because I love all I have. What to do?

 

 

20181127_093709_compress_42.jpg

20181124_194726_compress_62.jpg

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Dave you and I could be really good friends.  Much like you I collected sports stuff as a kid and once I got into my 20's I had three putters that I used.  Then I had five, then10 then I bought five Scotty's in a weekend and I was hooked.  Fast forward 20 years and I have a golf room full of putters many of which never have seen the course and unfortunately never really will.  I still own the Scotty Studio Design 2.5 that started the craze and throw it in the bag every once in a while just for old time's sake.

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15770076574637509975290995377992.thumb.jpg.18297f9e78c0ca920c89fca5651d5433.jpgHi I don't know much about putters or golf in general. I just crank drive balls in my back yard. I think I could be a good golfer I can crank them pretty far and be accurate but unfortunately money is an issue. However I'm really intrigued by a certain one and the man who's name is on it. I could only find 1 other one on the net that had sold long ago and they didn't say for how much.

The putter/head says.                        Doug Ford__***__ SEARS

The rod says Magna-Power Deluxe

The handle is white and says1577008678334156198987681980754.thumb.jpg.f2ce376f567c8afa4bc829685efda2ab.jpg. Golf Pride then in letters running parallel informe 15770087513118166490912568344615.thumb.jpg.fba2221eca074f87992cd2218c6caf05.jpgthere might have been another letter or two. I was told the handle was refered to as the controversial white pride handle? 15770076574637509975290995377992.thumb.jpg.18297f9e78c0ca920c89fca5651d5433.jpg

 

 

15770082115096707481151367014294.jpg

Edited by Jason Hamilton
Didn't like pictures

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