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DIY GOLF – How To Torch Finish Your OWN Wedges!


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Our 1st Reader Submitted DIY-GOLF Project

 

Today is our first installment of our brand new DIY-GOLF section on MyGolfSpy. We are super excited about bringing this new section to you for many reasons. We set-up this site (MyGolfSpy) for the sole purpose of truly educating golfers on everything about golf equipment. Like we have said in the past…the majority of sites and golf magazines are simply marketing machines posting biased info about the companies that advertise within their pages. Without the advertisers they simply do not exist. You rarely get the truth about what is being made and promoted these days in regards to golf equipment.

 

But we hope to change that mindset at MGS and we believe it is starting to happen. So we want MyGolfSpy to be the one place you can come for the truth about what is really going on in the industry. But we also want to shed light on many of the absolutely amazing products that you might never get to see. Whether it be because of the lack of financial backing, marketing or PR inexperience or any of the other reasons that don't allow these products to reach the masses. There are some ground-breaking products being made in the golf industry and we want to bring those to the fore front for you guys. This business has become like many other industries today, where all the bigger companies swallow up many of the innovative mom and pop operations…in the meantime squashing their innovative ideas in the process.

 

And lastly we want to teach everyone out there some of the surprising and fascinating ways the average golfer can customize and personalize their own golf equipment. And become the DIY-GOLF guy of their own town. You will be surprised how many golfers are going to be asking you to replicate these DIY GOLF projects on their clubs once you get your project in the bag and on the course for all of them to see. Some of the guys doing this in their own garages have started their own businesses applying these same DIY skills to other golfers clubs.

 

So let us begin our 1st reader submitted DIY project for you to try. Today's DIY GOLF project comes from Shane S. He wants to teach the MGS readers how to apply their own custom finish on their clubs by using some simple and cheap tools that anyone can pick up at their local hardware store. If you have a DIY project you would like to post on MyGolfSpy, simply send us an email to contact@mygolfspy.com.

 

DIY – How To Torch Finish Your OWN Wedges!

 

(WARNING: if quenching in oil during the cool down process make sure to do outside, there is always a risk when dipping a hot head into oil. You should make sure the head has cooled down considerably when dipping in oil.)

Tools Needed:

 

* Propane or Butane Torch – (purchase at any hardware store- Home Depot/Lowe's (COST = $10-$20)

* 1 Liter of Coca-Cola – (Cost = $2)

* Bench Vise – (Cost = $30-$50)

* Steel Brush - (or the steel end of your club brush) (Cost = $2-$5)

* Silicone Cloth – (can be purchased at any store that sells guns (Cost = $5)

 

torching-wedge-4.jpg

Step-by-Step Process

 

STEP 1: First, remove club head from shaft. If head is not removed the intense heat will cause the ferrule to melt and the epoxy to breakdown and a reshaft will be in order even if you keep the club and shaft intact.

 

STEP 2: Next, you will need to soak the club head using the 1 Liter Coke bottle for about an hour. This will strip any existing finish on the head. Get a bowl that is big enough to allow the head to fit while being fully submerged. Making sure the entire club is submergered will give you a more consistent torching.

 

STEP 3: Now remove your club from the Coke. Next you will need to secure club head in bench vise. If you do not have a bench vise you can use vise grips to hold the head in place. You will then want to scrub the entire club head with the steel brush or scotch-brite to break up any remaining finish left on the head. Now rinse the club with water (or) degreaser to make sure you get all oil and dirt off the head before torching, then let dry completely. If you do not remove all dirt and oil those areas will show up as different colors and will not be uniform.

 

torching-wedge-5.jpg

 

STEP 4: Secure club head in bench vise (see picture above). Next you will want to turn on your torch. You will want to apply heat directly to the clubhead in an even manner. The best heat is achieved when the pencil flame of the torch is approx. 2 inches away from head. This will take some time to get the torch finish you are looking for. You will generally not begin to see any changes for at least 4-5 minutes. Patience is the key with this type of finish.

 

Tip: If you want to experiment you can also place the head in oil while head is cooling down or rub oil on the head during the cooling process to achieve different style finishes. You can also use an oven to do the heating process. (WARNING: if quenching in oil during the cool down process make sure to do outside, there is always a risk when dipping a hot head into oil. You should make sure the head is not that hot when dipping in oil.)

 

torching-wedge-9.jpg

 

Tip: For a template of different temperatures and colors of steel when heated: CLICK HERE

 

STEP 5: Once you have reached your desired color from torching, remove heat source and then let cool for 45 minutes. Make sure to leave in a safe place while the head cools down. Your club has probably reached temperatures of 450*+ and it is best to be safe than sorry. If torch finish is not consistent or did not turn out the colors you liked, simply repeat the flaming step.

 

STEP 6: Since your club has been stripped of its original finish, it is now considered to be in the ‘RAW' state. You club will in fact rust when exposed to the elements. The best way to combat rust is to apply a Silicone Cloth to the club after each use/round.

 

torching-wedge-3.jpg

 

Tip: With any DIY project that requires the altering of a club (refinish, stamping, paintfill, etc) it is best to practice on an old club first versus going out and performing your first trial run on your gaming set of clubs. Dig in the garage, look at used clubs at a local shop or ‘borrow' one from your buddies.

 

BEFORE PHOTOS: Titleist Spin Milled with the Tour Chrome Finish

 

torching-wedge-2.jpg

AFTER PHOTOS: (torched finish with white paint fill)

torching-wedge-1.jpg

 

Finished product (with white paint fill-Testors Model Paint-available at any hobby store)

 

OTHER EXAMPLES OF TORCH FLAMED WEDGES

torching-wedge-6.jpg

torching-wedge-7.jpg

torching-wedge-8.jpg

 

Want to post your own DIY project on MyGolfSpy? Simple send your idea to contact@mygolfspy.com and we will email you the DIY guidelines. Every published DIY author will receive a prize from MyGolfSpy! (cash, equipment & apparel prizes to be awarded)

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A few things I noticed and didn't agree with.

 

First, the clubs have to be raw to start with, they won't end up raw. You can't flame finish a plated or coated club. Well, you could flame them but you're not going to change the color any.

 

Second, I don't like Coking the clubs. It's messy for one, and takes too long for point #2. Another thing is if you miss a spot and don't get all of the coke off, you're going to end up with brown or black spots where the syrup was at. I prefer to use either CLR, Bar Keeper's friend or naval jelly. CLR is my first choice because it's easy, you mix the concentrate with water according to the directions. Then, you simply submerge the head for 5-10 minutes and rinse it off and towel it dry. No messy clean up. I also recommend wearing latex gloves when handling the head afterward to keep your hands clean, and to keep the oil and pollutants from your skin from transferring to the club, as those will cause browning and uneven finishes.

 

Next, it never mentions to remove the paintfill, but that's a necessary step because the paing will melt and run and cause smoky black spots where it's at. It has to be gone.

 

I also prefer to use a spray on silicone because you can get to places that the cloth won't get to. I prefer CRC's spray silicone, or their new product I like is SP-350 Rust Preventer. It's silicone based, but also prevents rust longer. Both work great.

 

 

Another tip for those that don't already have a torch, you don't have to buy one unless you're wanting to smoke the club to black. You can get the wheat colors and purples and blues using your oven set on broil, plus you get to watch it through the window. As always, make sure not to grab the hot club. Using the oven also allows for a more even heating and more even finishes. Unless you're wanting a fade finish, that's really the simplest way IMO (and I torch a lot of stuff).

 

I also like to advise to stop slightly short of the desired color because it will continue changing after the heat is removed because of heat being held in the metal.

 

Just a few other tips from over the years. The original method will work fine, but I do my projects a little different the OP. Good topic and good beginner DIY though.

 

One last thing I forgot. Instead of Testors, I prefer Tamiya X-Acrylic paints. They seem to hold up much better for me and are available in lots more colors.

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In The Bag
Driver: TaylorMade M2 (2017) w/ Project X T1100 HZRDUS Handcrafted 65x 
Strong 3 wood: Taylormade M1 15* w/ ProjectX T1100 HZRDUS handcrafted 75x
3 Hybrid: Adams PRO 18* w/ KBS Tour Hybrid S flex tipped 1/2"
4 Hybrid: Adams PRO 20* (bent to 21*) w/ KBS Tour Hybrid S flex tipped 1/2"
4-AW: TaylorMade P770 w/ Dynamic Gold Tour Issue Black Onyx S400

SW: 56* Scratch Tour Dept(CC grooves) w/ Dynamic Gold Spinner
LW: 60* Scratch Tour Department (CC grooves) w/ Dynamic Gold Spinner
XW: 64* Cally XForged Vintage w/ DG X100 8 iron tiger stepped
Putter: Nike Method Prototype 006 at 34"

Have a ton of back-ups in all categories, but there are always 14 clubs in the bag that differ depending on the course and set-up. Bomb and gouge. Yes, I'm a club gigolo.

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Thanks for the oven tip. I cleaned and torched an old Spalding Mills #1 last summer. At one point I had great purples in it and then they went away. Thought it was the motor oil quench that gave the color. Turned out OK looking, but I think after reading this that I torched it too long and hot.

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This thread makes me want to run to the used club bin to buy some raw wedges just so I can play with a propane torch.

 

Note to the author of this DIY: my wife hates you, or at least she will pretty soon. ;)

Buy her an afternoon at the spa then go nuts with the oven.

Volvo Intorqueo

 

All the cool kids follow me on twitter: @golfspy_dave

 

If you are not a cool kid, following me on twitter will make you cool...

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Buy her an afternoon at the spa then go nuts with the oven.

then buy her a new oven.....

What I lug around the golf course in my MacKenzie Walker.

Driver -   Ping G410 Plus 9° Tour 65 S
Fairway -  :srixon-small: Z785 13.5° Tensei CK Pro Orange 70 S

2 Iron - :srixon-small: ZU65 18° AeroTech SteelFiber 110icw S

Irons -  :srixon-small: Z785  TTDG IT S400 3,5-Pw 1° flat
Wedges - :cleveland-small: RTX4 Raw 50° 54° 58°  TTGDTI S400 1° flat

Putters -   Odyssey Toulon Stroke Lab Austin/Nike  Method Converge B1-01 UST Frequency Filter/Odyssey 2 Ball DFX/ TaylorMade Spider
Tour Black / Ping Anser F/ Scotty Cameron TeI3 Sole Stamp Newport 2. All with different grips, weights, and lengths.
 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi Guys,

 

Awesome post... but I'm a little confused here. There seems to be a missed step in the process for the "Titleist Spin Milled with the Tour Chrome Finish." I assume by the comments and my basic knowledge of the whole process that there was a step that included having that chrome finished stripped, but by the pictures it appears you can take the head as is and torch it right from there.

 

Can anyone (and/or the original poster) shed any light on this? Thanks!

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STEP 2: Next, you will need to soak the club head using the 1 Liter Coke bottle for about an hour. This will strip any existing finish on the head. Get a bowl that is big enough to allow the head to fit while being fully submerged. Making sure the entire club is submergered will give you a more consistent torching.

The Coke strips the finish, I believe.

Volvo Intorqueo

 

All the cool kids follow me on twitter: @golfspy_dave

 

If you are not a cool kid, following me on twitter will make you cool...

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STEP 2: Next, you will need to soak the club head using the 1 Liter Coke bottle for about an hour. This will strip any existing finish on the head. Get a bowl that is big enough to allow the head to fit while being fully submerged. Making sure the entire club is submergered will give you a more consistent torching.

The Coke strips the finish, I believe.

 

That makes me feel very bad about the amount of Coke I consumed this past week. It's probably stripping the coating on my stomach.

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That makes me feel very bad about the amount of Coke I consumed this past week. It's probably stripping the coating on my stomach.

If and when you have kids, buy a tooth from one of your kids (tooth fairy will not mind) then put it in coke overnight. Bye bye tooth, hello lesson on nutrition and brushing.

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If and when you have kids, buy a tooth from one of your kids (tooth fairy will not mind) then put it in coke overnight. Bye bye tooth, hello lesson on nutrition and brushing.

 

Nice. You can do the same thing with a quarter, I think, or any coin. I think after a while (maybe overnight, maybe longer) that will dissolve too. Scary to think about that...but I love Coke so much!

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STEP 2: Next, you will need to soak the club head using the 1 Liter Coke bottle for about an hour. This will strip any existing finish on the head. Get a bowl that is big enough to allow the head to fit while being fully submerged. Making sure the entire club is submergered will give you a more consistent torching.

The Coke strips the finish, I believe.

 

The Coke doesn't strip the Chrome finish as far as I can tell. If it did, I believe NOBODY would want to drink Coke anymore, haha.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Coke nor any other household chemical will not strip the chrome. You could try to etch the chrome with muratic acid (which is pretty much the same thing as hydrochloric acid) in your home, but I wouldn't recommend it. It is very corrosive and will eat your skin if it comes into contact with it. Another bad thing about it is that you have to have a hazmat license to dispose of it and you have to find a place that will take it. Ever heard of Erin Brockovich? The chemical byproduct when using muratic acid to etch chrome is what she became famous for (hexavalent chromium). It's much easier to take it to a chrome plater and have them strip it. If they can apply chrome and rechrome parts, they can strip it. They have to be able to. They'll charge you about $10 a head. But, also be advised that you will lose weight, thus altering the club's swingweight.

 

Stainless and raw carbon are the only materials that can readily be torched. The carbon will slightly harden as well, so your clubs will go from feeling buttery to a little clicky upon torching them. Just a little information for those that are feel players and like their clubs to feel a certain way. You will alter the feel of carbon clubs by torching them.

In The Bag
Driver: TaylorMade M2 (2017) w/ Project X T1100 HZRDUS Handcrafted 65x 
Strong 3 wood: Taylormade M1 15* w/ ProjectX T1100 HZRDUS handcrafted 75x
3 Hybrid: Adams PRO 18* w/ KBS Tour Hybrid S flex tipped 1/2"
4 Hybrid: Adams PRO 20* (bent to 21*) w/ KBS Tour Hybrid S flex tipped 1/2"
4-AW: TaylorMade P770 w/ Dynamic Gold Tour Issue Black Onyx S400

SW: 56* Scratch Tour Dept(CC grooves) w/ Dynamic Gold Spinner
LW: 60* Scratch Tour Department (CC grooves) w/ Dynamic Gold Spinner
XW: 64* Cally XForged Vintage w/ DG X100 8 iron tiger stepped
Putter: Nike Method Prototype 006 at 34"

Have a ton of back-ups in all categories, but there are always 14 clubs in the bag that differ depending on the course and set-up. Bomb and gouge. Yes, I'm a club gigolo.

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As far as the corrosive properties of Coke are concerned, take a steak and submerge it in Coke overnight (it's a science experiment for the kids even, as we did it at school). It'll be gone or nearly gone the next morning. It'll be a good way to try to get the kids to drink less Coke and more nutritious stuff as well. As for what it does to your stomach, your stomach is more acidic than the Coke is, so it does not eat the lining of your stomach. The natural acids in there protect against that, which is also how you're able to digest food.

In The Bag
Driver: TaylorMade M2 (2017) w/ Project X T1100 HZRDUS Handcrafted 65x 
Strong 3 wood: Taylormade M1 15* w/ ProjectX T1100 HZRDUS handcrafted 75x
3 Hybrid: Adams PRO 18* w/ KBS Tour Hybrid S flex tipped 1/2"
4 Hybrid: Adams PRO 20* (bent to 21*) w/ KBS Tour Hybrid S flex tipped 1/2"
4-AW: TaylorMade P770 w/ Dynamic Gold Tour Issue Black Onyx S400

SW: 56* Scratch Tour Dept(CC grooves) w/ Dynamic Gold Spinner
LW: 60* Scratch Tour Department (CC grooves) w/ Dynamic Gold Spinner
XW: 64* Cally XForged Vintage w/ DG X100 8 iron tiger stepped
Putter: Nike Method Prototype 006 at 34"

Have a ton of back-ups in all categories, but there are always 14 clubs in the bag that differ depending on the course and set-up. Bomb and gouge. Yes, I'm a club gigolo.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 2 months later...

Moody, you can strip them down and start over, that's the beauty of torching. Just submerge them in CLR for 5-10 minutes and they'll be back to the standard finish.

In The Bag
Driver: TaylorMade M2 (2017) w/ Project X T1100 HZRDUS Handcrafted 65x 
Strong 3 wood: Taylormade M1 15* w/ ProjectX T1100 HZRDUS handcrafted 75x
3 Hybrid: Adams PRO 18* w/ KBS Tour Hybrid S flex tipped 1/2"
4 Hybrid: Adams PRO 20* (bent to 21*) w/ KBS Tour Hybrid S flex tipped 1/2"
4-AW: TaylorMade P770 w/ Dynamic Gold Tour Issue Black Onyx S400

SW: 56* Scratch Tour Dept(CC grooves) w/ Dynamic Gold Spinner
LW: 60* Scratch Tour Department (CC grooves) w/ Dynamic Gold Spinner
XW: 64* Cally XForged Vintage w/ DG X100 8 iron tiger stepped
Putter: Nike Method Prototype 006 at 34"

Have a ton of back-ups in all categories, but there are always 14 clubs in the bag that differ depending on the course and set-up. Bomb and gouge. Yes, I'm a club gigolo.

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