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glfballwacker

Sand wedge

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So it seems I have of late developed a problem getting myself out of the sand. I used to have a call away iron set that came with a SW. I have since moved on to a new set and am now using a Cleveland 588 forged 56° with 14 bounce. When I set up and swing like I used to the ball goes about 6" I'm wondering if maybe I have an improper club setup or what I might be doing. also has anybody used the cobra trusty rusty with tri bounce sole? Would this help some of my issues

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Take Less sand maybe? More acceleration through impact with a full follow through? Ball inside left heel with open club face and open stance?

 

It isn't the wedge it's the wedgie

 

My initial guess is too much sand while decelerating through impact with lack of follow through

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What apprenti23 said.....

 

I had the same problem last year , 3 different wedges later I found myself decelerating through impact. Swing through the shot and you will be fine....

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Have you tried hitting 100 balls out of a practice bunker? That usually helps the sand game!

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Could partially be the wedge according to a few leading designers. Are you a digger or sweeper with your normal swing? Bounce and leading edge on the wedge could effect your success from the sand more so than anywhere on the course. Having high bounce is just the start of the wedge design, how sharp or blunt is the leading edge, etc...

 

Wishon did a good write up on it a while back, I'll see if I can find it.

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It's not going to be the wedge if the ball only moves 6". Go with apprenti's post.

 

 

A too sharp leading edge causes the club to dig. If the club digs and gets stuck/slows down too much, the ball isn't coming out. Blunting up the leading edge will prevent digging.

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Thank s for all of the input you're all real helpful I do try to practice my Sandy's at the course but there always seems to be a lot of people in the chipping area and I'm afraid to skull the ball and take out one of the other golfers

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RB-

 

You gotta realize, those guys are in the club selling business- of course they want you to buy new/different wedges!

 

You could hit any club in your bag for a bunker shot and you'll get it to advance- he's hitting it only a couple feet.

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Thank s for all of the input you're all real helpful I do try to practice my Sandy's at the course but there always seems to be a lot of people in the chipping area and I'm afraid to skull the ball and take out one of the other golfers

 

 

I learned to use my sand wedge in a normal hitting bay on the range, trying to do the sand shots as if the ball were in sand. I did the same for my short game and came there was not much difference unless you had a lie that truly demanded a special shot. Even then, as long as you got to know your wedge, there was a pretty good shot you could get out of the trap most times. You don't really have to blast to learn how to blast, but you do have to become familiar enough with the feel and heft of the wedge to have a better chance at some fancier shots. Most of the time the only need is to let the club do the work and control the strength of the swing.

 

 

 

Shambles

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There are several different ways to succesfully execute a sand shot so I'm not going to suggest one seeing as though I don't know your game.

 

Someone wrote about hitting 100 balls out of a practice bunker - pick your prefered technique and go do that and you'll be fine. Having the right wedge for your game and the conditions that you normally find yourself in helps but in the end you could hit the ball out of most bunkers and on the green with a 5 iron if you practice enough.

 

I do wonder if your course hasn't changed the sand on you - lots of clubs put in new sand in the springtime and sometimes bunkers go from being firm to being very fluffy over night - that could be your issue.

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The cure is always new clubs...seriously though, a tip that helped me a lot is the shorts the bunker shot, the steeper the take away and decending blow. The longer, the shallower.

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Id have to agree with the others that its likely not the wedge thats the problem.

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I guess I'm not really blaming the wedge just saying that I went from a set included SW which had a real nice wide blunt leading edge sole to a forged blade and was wondering if there were any tips. I am hardly ever in the sand maybe once every 4-5 rounds but last week it seemed no matter what I was in sand all over the place . It was a new course and using new irons . Im gonna try some of the pointers tomorrow morning before my local bullpen round

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See, apprenti, there is merit to the wedge design from reading his latest post. And I know they're in the club selling business, but it doesn't change the fact that Wishon is one of the most knowledgable designers in the business. If sole design/grind/leading edge shape doesn't matter, why is variance even offered? I can't hit a blunt leading edge wedge, and I'm a digger. I sharpen mine and then put a light bluntness to it. Then I reshape the sole to my liking where it interacts properly for me and what I need/like.

 

As for the original question, technique, as apprenti suggests, will fix the issue now that you know what it is. Being with a less blunt leading edge and narrower sole, I'm gonna say that you'll want to shallow out the swing and initiate contact a little closer to the ball. This will combat the digging and allow the sole to work properly and glide through the sand and ride out on a pillow of sand. Imagine trying to throw around a pint of sand out of the bunker with the ball.

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To be clear I'm not saying, nor would I ever say that the wedge doesn't matter - it does but so does the technique - without seeing a guy swing and without knowing what type of sand he normally plays in it's very difficult to suggest the proper wedge - It's very easy to identify the fact that there is an issue with technique if he's not even getting the ball out of the sand.

 

Match the wedge to the swing type, sand type and you have the ideal - that's goign to come either through trial and error or by finding a teacher who will make the recommendation.

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The sand has always been somewhere I'm very comfortable but early this season I was making a right mess of simple bunker shots - the opposite to you I was hitting the damn thing clean and straight through the green.

 

After 3 rounds of this I went to the practice bunker, kept doing it! Then I stopped focussing on the ball, picked a spot behind the ball (which depends on the length of shot for instance) and focused on that instead. Since then feeling great out of the sand again, just making sure I pick my spot and commit to it - because any deceleration is a problem from the bunker.

 

As for my sand wedge, its an old and rusty cleveland cg10 with 58 degrees of loft; it needs changing but worried about not being as confident with a new one.

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