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QuietStorm

Qutting Golf

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Been there before. When it was time I hated it, when it was money, I just practiced a lot. Practice led a lot of wedges in my yard. Frustration was when I couldn't put them all together at once.

 

Hang in there. Golf is one of the greatest inventions. It's a stroll not a sprint as a very wise man on here said.

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Went through a time when I did quit, for four years. I was putting too much pressure on myself and didn't really have the money to play as much as I wanted. When I did come back to golf it was for a work outing and just a scramble. Had no expectations for myself other than to have fun. The separation made me appreciate it more for the game it is. Take a break! Then come back if you want to.

 

 

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I am cosidering quitting golf as I found myself dealing with this equation for sometime:

 

time + effort + money = frustration

 

Anybody in the same situation?

My brothers both gave it up years ago, mostly for the general frustration. If one is not having “fun” out there, there's no reason to keep doing it, but that goes with anything in life.

 

 

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I have been in that situation many times. You really have to just have fun. Just don't worry about your score -- heck, don't even keep score. It's all about enjoying your time out there. That's what keeps us comimg back.

 

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I truly love this game but sometimes you need a break. I am glad we get a few months away from the game each year here in Illinois. It gives me time to recharge the golf batteries and enjoy other areas of my life. So you might not need to quit just take a little break.

 

 

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Interesting topic.I personally think quit immediately if your not having fun/ frustrated or think golf is over priced.The longer you hang on to a hobby you hate the worse the separation turns out.Find something you enjoy doing and give it your full attention.In a short amount of time, you will have completely forgotten about golf.

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If it's about the poor play lower your expectations and play just for the opportunity to get outdoors to enjoy exercise, scenery, & your buddies.  As for not having time to play then wait until you retire and you'll have all the time you need.   If it's about the money part then you need to  find a low cost hobby like coon hunting. Hunt for the treeing aspect and don't shoot the poor critter. 

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I started a new job in 2007 and stopped playing. Then I started having kids so I didn't play again until 2014. I was so busy during that time I didn't miss golf at all. I actually thought I might not play anymore as the guitar became my new hobby I could enjoy without leaving the house.

 

Well, our situations always change. In 2014 we moved to a house on a golf course, I started playing again, I began teaching my wife to play and now my oldest daughter is about to start lessons. I'm glad I didn't lose my love of the game as I hope to have many more years playing with my wife and kids, and even grandkids someday.

 

Maybe it is time in your life to step away from the game a bit. If you don't want to put in the effort, well maybe it's just not for you. But if it's lack of time and money, well hopefully your situation changes and you can get back into the game in the future.

 

 

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I took an extended break. Was down to a 5.5 and then developed the “hosel fades”, aka shanks to an extent that I could not hit the ball. It was the worst. Left the game for over a year due to some work circumstances, came back and they were gone. I would say take a break for a while. It's a great game that should be enjoyable. If it's not that for you right now it's a waste of time and money.

 

 

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Lots of good advice here. I find that if I'm frustrated when I take a break I come back reenergized and do better. Unless your planning on making a living at golf , it's about having fun and building friendships.

 

 

 

 

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Probably I need a break.

 

I became an avid player in 2007. Have been investing thousands of dollars especially in equipments. I practise almost every afternoon. And everyday, I feel tired and have no time for other activities.

 

Yet, my game does not commensurate the resources consumed and hence, frustration in every single game.

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I am cosidering quitting golf as I found myself dealing with this equation for sometime:

 

time + effort + money = frustration

 

Anybody in the same situation?

 

I'm kind of guessing your mind's made up with those 4 elements gnawing on you. I'm not in your situation as I've been a lifelong golfer and it's my thing quite frankly. I couldn't imagine myself walking away based on your equation. I concede that golf can be time consuming especially if you're interested in improving. Which by the way never ends at any level of proficiency. To enjoy and progress; golf can take a reasonable amount of effort too. (practice, playing, lessons, etc.) Golf can be expensive I suppose (relative to your income) based on where you play and how much. Lastly, golf might be the most frustrating game known to man. So if you can't overcome your 4 elements or at least learn to live with them and accept them you might be done. EDIT: Let's face it.... golf isn't for everyone nor is it meant to be.

Best wishes with your decision.

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I think every golfer that takes the game somewhat seriously has been there.

 

 

time + effort + money = frustration

 

Time... unless you are retired and don't have the daily grind to contend with, it can get hard to find time to play/practice. I average 50+ hours a week for 9 months out of the year, so I understand.

 

Effort.... you get out of it what you put into it, within reason. You can only get so good without lessons and another set of eyes. No amount of practice on your own will help if you practice the wrong way or the wrong things. That's a broad brush statement, but it's by and large, true.

 

Money..... I can really relate to this one. I don't have the income to play "nice" courses too many times a season. I play my local public course 80% of the time because I pay $330.00 a year for a membership that allows me to play the entire year for that price if I walk. If I ride, it's $10.00 a round during the week and $12.00 a round on weekends. I do play "nice" courses a few times a season.

 

Frustration.... yep, it's just part of the game. We all want to play well every time we go out. The reality is that we are all just playing a game that in my opinion is the hardest game there is to be good at.

 

I've learned to just accept that I'm a working man that has limited time and funds to allocate to golf. I will never be a + or low single digit player.... unless I win the lottery...lol. Just have fun and enjoy your time playing the game. Enjoy your time with your buddies and the fact that you aren't at work, mowing the lawn or some other task you'd rather not do.

 

It's really not so serious as to give up something you enjoy just because you can't be very good at it. Just my .02.

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I think every golfer that takes the game somewhat seriously has been there.

 

 

time + effort + money = frustration

 

Time... unless you are retired and don't have the daily grind to contend with, it can get hard to find time to play/practice. I average 50+ hours a week for 9 months out of the year, so I understand.

 

Effort.... you get out of it what you put into it, within reason. You can only get so good without lessons and another set of eyes. No amount of practice on your own will help if you practice the wrong way or the wrong things. That's a broad brush statement, but it's by and large, true.

 

Money..... I can really relate to this one. I don't have the income to play "nice" courses too many times a season. I play my local public course 80% of the time because I pay $330.00 a year for a membership that allows me to play the entire year for that price if I walk. If I ride, it's $10.00 a round during the week and $12.00 a round on weekends. I do play "nice" courses a few times a season.

 

Frustration.... yep, it's just part of the game. We all want to play well every time we go out. The reality is that we are all just playing a game that in my opinion is the hardest game there is to be good at.

 

I've learned to just accept that I'm a working man that has limited time and funds to allocate to golf. I will never be a + or low single digit player.... unless I win the lottery...lol. Just have fun and enjoy your time playing the game. Enjoy your time with your buddies and the fact that you aren't at work, mowing the lawn or some other task you'd rather not do.

 

It's really not so serious as to give up something you enjoy just because you can't be very good at it. Just my .02.

 

What he said  ^^^^^^^    When we start taking golf too serious is when we're gonna get our feelings hurt.......

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Just my 2c but if you have the time to be practising almost daily, it's your practice routine/what you practice? Personally I like to pick my pros brains especially during short game lessons with different ways to practice

 

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Probably I need a break.

 

I became an avid player in 2007. Have been investing thousands of dollars especially in equipments. I practise almost every afternoon. And everyday, I feel tired and have no time for other activities.

 

Yet, my game does not commensurate the resources consumed and hence, frustration in every single game.

Hang in there. It can be a frustrating game. Some thoughts from my experience, along what others have said:

 

First question is to step back and ask are your expectations realistic? The game won't be fun if they aren't. I was in that boat.

 

Are you practicing based upon good face to face instruction, or just reinforcing bad habits based on what you think you're doing wrong? Internet videos can't replace good F2F instruction either. If you have an instructor and don't seem to be improving, nothing wrong with trying to find someone else. I had a guy I was seeing for a short time, and while he helped, it was more him trying to adapt to my habits. I searched and found another guy , a little bit more expensive, but night and day swing in one lesson. He took me back to fundamentals. In an hour, it was magical. I started practicing what worked and after a few lessons to ensure we reinforced the good habits, we back off in frequency due to money but did 30 min check-ins when needed. Most times it's such a subtle tweak to a position or swing mechanic, I wouldn't have figured it out. He videos the lessons and diagrams on the screen my bad vs good swings, which helps me because I'm a visual learned. I can see what I'm doing wrong. Still see him a few times a year when I fall off the wagon. I'm never going to be on tour, but I'm enjoying the game so much more now because I'm playing MY game now.

 

Is it the arrow or the Indian?

 

Then I went and got fitted for equipment a little at a time, once my swing was reasonably solid and consistent. I'm now a firm believer that's it's difficult, if not risky financially, to just buy off the rack. Getting the right shaft has been huge. It doesn't have to be expensive either to get fitted, and can help when looking at used clubs too. Everyone hypes this or that new club. I found the shaft and heads that I hit solidly, with the best dispersion, that I could play. Not what some ranking or video pro says is great.

 

Mentally, I used to beat myself up. I should have scored better on a hole. Taking too aggressive a shot to keep up or beat the guys I was playing with. And then I'd fall apart. Now, I just play myself and the hole as smartly as I can. If I screw up, it's a lesson I can't get on the range. Which is the other thing I've learned. The range is for practicing fundamentals. The course is where you practice the game. That maybe a ‘duh' moment for many of you, but I too struggled and got frustrated with ineffective practice. I wasn't practicing right. Now I try to go out even to just play 9 as a single. It took a few rounds to get past being nervous as a single, but reminded myself I'm playing me - not these other guys. It's my practice round.

 

Hopefully something here is helpful. It's a great, challenging, and certainly a frustrating game at times. You're not alone.

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Well the question was: “anybody else in that same situation?”

 

I'm not.

 

Have I ever felt like quitting? Of course.

 

Have I taken a break? Well I spent the first 50 years of my life in Northern Climates so breaks of some type were enforced. I also took a break when my first child was born. I didn't quit altogether but backed way off and used those couple of years to rebuild my swing away from the reverse C of the 70's to something easier on the back.

 

I had been very frustrated the last couple of years so I worked hard on my game, recalibrated my expectations and admitted that having crossed the barrier of 60 it's okay to play the set of tees that allows me to have fun.

 

Of course this all is up to you. That's my journey - Golf is an important stress release for me. I can't let it go at this point.

 

Best wishes!

 

 

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