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"Course Management" has been mentioned several times, but...... How does a bogey golfer actually learn it?

 

Experience, of course, and being "mindful" on the course while playing and noting and learning (err, ummm .. TRYING to learn....) from your mistakes. Playing lessons can also be very valuable.

 

Certainly there are any number of online resources; one I've found I think is pretty good is a 10 part series on Plugged In Golf...

https://pluggedingolf.com/course-management-basics-part-1/

Matt Saternus, formally GolfSpy Matt, was a member here when I joined.  He always had good info and seems to have done well with pluggedingolf.com

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This is the 37th post in this thread, there is a lot of information here, the majority of it being good. However if I was reading this as a golfer it would be way to much to decipher and implement. Part of the problem is the amount of information, the internet is the golfers best friend and worst enemy at the same time. IMO a bogey golfer should focus on one thing and one thing only. Golf is all about eliminating variables. Bogey golfers have more variables than a scratch golfer, whether that is swing, course management or anything else that comes into play. I didn't learn the game in the "traditional' fashion, so it is difficult for me to explain how I am not a bogey golfer. However in teaching my son the game (12 yo) the focus was starting at 100 yards and in and has now moved to 150 in. That is it. I also eliminated variables for him. If he hit it in the bunker, he would take it out and drop behind the bunker for example. It keeps it fun for him and allows him to play shots that factor in the majority of scoring. I guess my point in this ramble is to focus on one thing and one thing only. Once you are comfortable move on to the next thing. I would start from 100 yards in and move from there. I firmly believe that the game of golf should be taught backwards from green to tee.

There's a school of thought in golf instruction that follows this approach. Basically, no one should ever be a bogey golfer. They should start out close enough to the hole to always make 4, then start moving farther back to challenge themselves. There's a lot of merit to it.

 

My 10 year old daughter is a little peanut, she can hit a driver about 100 yards. So I try to start her at about 150 for a par 4 and 200 for a par 5. It's more fun for her.

 

Sent from my SM-J727VPP using MyGolfSpy mobile app

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To be honest, I know all the things I have seen here and I do most of the things here. I think the more likely culprit, at least for me, is consistency. Which can only be improved by lots of practice. Most weekend players that shoot 95-105 just don't have time to practice too. For me I have to choose. Would I rather go hit 120 balls for 14 dollars or play 18 holes for 17 dollars (Twilight Walking weekend price). 

 

I would just rather get out and play a round even though in general I improve most when I've had a good bit of range time...It's just making the choice on how I'd rather spend the little golf time that I have. 

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To be honest, I know all the things I have seen here and I do most of the things here. I think the more likely culprit, at least for me, is consistency. Which can only be improved by lots of practice. Most weekend players that shoot 95-105 just don't have time to practice too. For me I have to choose. Would I rather go hit 120 balls for 14 dollars or play 18 holes for 17 dollars (Twilight Walking weekend price). 

 

I would just rather get out and play a round even though in general I improve most when I've had a good bit of range time...It's just making the choice on how I'd rather spend the little golf time that I have. 

I'd add to this, instruction and practice are what most of us probably need.  You can practice without instruction and  groove your swing faults to increase consistency, but there's only so far we can go with that.  Swing faults and compensations will always be less consistent than better swing mechanics.

But I do agree, we all have to make compromises between living real life and dedicating time to golf.

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I'd add to this, instruction and practice are what most of us probably need.  You can practice without instruction and  groove your swing faults to increase consistency, but there's only so far we can go with that.  Swing faults and compensations will always be less consistent than better swing mechanics.

But I do agree, we all have to make compromises between living real life and dedicating time to golf.

So true.  I spent years practicing my swing that had no chance of getting getting decent. I had too many poor mechanics to consistently produce a repeatable swing.  When I finally took lessons and started practicing swing drills that eliminated some of my faults, I scored better.  The initial drop in my index was from 24 to 16.  That didn't take long, but it took dedication.  Going lower has been tougher and still requires a lesson or two just to maintain a 9 index.  If I don't practice every week, I will quickly go up to 11.

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To be honest, I know all the things I have seen here and I do most of the things here. I think the more likely culprit, at least for me, is consistency. Which can only be improved by lots of practice. Most weekend players that shoot 95-105 just don't have time to practice too. For me I have to choose. Would I rather go hit 120 balls for 14 dollars or play 18 holes for 17 dollars (Twilight Walking weekend price). 

 

I would just rather get out and play a round even though in general I improve most when I've had a good bit of range time...It's just making the choice on how I'd rather spend the little golf time that I have.

When you're playing twilight, are you playing by yourself or with others? Is the course crowded? My favorite way to practice is out on the golf course late in the day.

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When you're playing twilight, are you playing by yourself or with others? Is the course crowded? My favorite way to practice is out on the golf course late in the day.

I try to get out by myself if I'm doing twilight. I walk for the workout and it gives me time to clear my head and think through things.

 

It's really random how crowded it's gonna be. This time it was crowded and It took 2 hours for 9. Last time I got through 18 in about 2.5 hours and the course was dead. You never know.

 

Sent from my Pixel 2 using MyGolfSpy mobile app

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This thread is GOLD! I've read every post and there certainly are some real gems here for me to consider. Thank you all!

It's a great thread for everyone, not just bogey+ golfers!!

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I try to get out by myself if I'm doing twilight. I walk for the workout and it gives me time to clear my head and think through things.

 

It's really random how crowded it's gonna be. This time it was crowded and It took 2 hours for 9. Last time I got through 18 in about 2.5 hours and the course was dead. You never know.

All part of rolling the dice for late day golf.

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I think course management comes down to knowing yourself and playing smart.  Know your miss and play it to your strength.  I also think golfers don't take enough time to read the scorecard and understand the hole.  Play your tee shot to the widest part of the fairway/green.  Sometimes hitting driver is not the best idea.  It's not necessarily course management but practice areas that you need improving most.  If you three putt multiple times around, don't blame the driver for a bad score.  Maybe the next range session the putter needs the work.  If you aren't improving, change your routine.  Think about the course different and restructure practice. 

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6 hours ago, walkerracing23 said:

I think course management comes down to knowing yourself and playing smart.  Know your miss and play it to your strength.  I also think golfers don't take enough time to read the scorecard and understand the hole.  Play your tee shot to the widest part of the fairway/green.  Sometimes hitting driver is not the best idea.  It's not necessarily course management but practice areas that you need improving most.  If you three putt multiple times around, don't blame the driver for a bad score.  Maybe the next range session the putter needs the work.  If you aren't improving, change your routine.  Think about the course different and restructure practice. 

Do you watch Golf Sidekick on YouTube?  You sound just like a playa.

He's super-conservative on the golf course, but he loses his patience every once in a while, and I can identify with that.  He's gotten me back into thinking about where I want to miss if I'm going to miss, which helps a great deal.

 

 

 

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On 8/17/2018 at 2:56 PM, THEZIPR23 said:

I would start from 100 yards in and move from there. I firmly believe that the game of golf should be taught backwards from green to tee

That seems like really sound advice, but how do you practically go about that? Focus on shorter distances at the range? Or play rounds starting off 150 out on the fairway? I'm just not sure I'd be able to stomach green fees if I feel like I'm missing out on half the holes.

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All of the info provided by scratch players on stress-free golf and course management are all well and good for scratch players.  Bogey golfers can certainly learn to minimize risk better than some do.  

However, not all bogey golfers will opt to play a 2i instead of a driver.  I'm just guessing but I think the percentage of bogey golfers that carry a 2i is quite small.  For the bogey golfers that drive the ball fairly well, their play should be to get the ball in play as far down the fairway as possible.  Most likely, their issues will be getting the next shot on or close to the green and getting the ball into the hole from around the green.  Then there are the bogey golfers that struggle off the tee to find a fairway or don't hit the ball far enough to get on or near the green in regulation (even playing the correct tees).  These golfers will need to play smart second and third shots, become masters of recovery shots, and perfect their play inside 100 yards because they will be there a lot.

For both types of bogey golfers, I am describing myself 20 years ago.  Oh wait... that was me two weekends ago!!  As we all know, we have good rounds and bad rounds.  When I have a bad round, I miss fairways, chunk hybrids or thin iron shots.  I can do all those things, but if I'm pitching and putting well, I can turn a terrible round into a just OK round.  The short game can save you.  Of course, the goal is to eliminate all of those bad shots you took to get to the green, but while you are getting your swing issues worked out, spend an equivalent amount of time practicing getting the ball up and in.  It will quickly get you below bogey golf, and it will serve you well when your ball striking improves.

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On 7/10/2019 at 9:45 AM, Kenny B said:

These golfers will need to play smart second and third shots, become masters of recovery shots, and perfect their play inside 100 yards because they will be there a lot.

:: raises hand::✋

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On 7/10/2019 at 3:17 AM, ncwoz said:

That seems like really sound advice, but how do you practically go about that? Focus on shorter distances at the range? Or play rounds starting off 150 out on the fairway? I'm just not sure I'd be able to stomach green fees if I feel like I'm missing out on half the holes.

This is the tough part. Late evening rounds are the best. Course is quiet and you can hit multiple shots on holes. You can focus on direction and contact on range but unless you are using game balls distance on range is futile attempt. 

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