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You have to play to the course setup as well, but if you continually come up 5-10 yard short of every green, adding a club will get you to the green. Once you start hitting it over the greens, switch to the shorter clubs. Most times though it's ego that keeps us from using the correct club, instead we hit the one that comes up short

My wife and I use both a laser and GPS when we play.  She always uses the laser; I never do.  She will tell me the distance to the flag; I look where the flag is located.  If it's back, I use the GPS center number.  Our greens are very firm and stopping balls on approaches isn't easy.  If it's a front pin, I use the GPS front number unless it's closer to the middle.  

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There is a guy in my Saturday foresome who plays to “Frankie par” which is basically bogey golf. He's happy if he leaves the course shooting 90 or less.

 

Several items to add to this for your consideration...

 

I've played with more bogey golfers then I can count and the #1 reason that keeps a bogey golfer there is that you can't hit a chip shot accurately from 70 yards and in. You chunk it, blade it or something in that neighborhood. Why not just take a pitching wedge from within 90 yards of the green and master that club. Take the other wedges out of your bag until you get deadly with a PW around the greens.

 

Also, I bet I can beat you on a par 5 if I take 7 iron off of the tee and play from where that ends up. Meanwhile, go ahead and hit your driver in the bunker, or out of bounds, or behind a tree, or in the water, or anywhere but the fairway. I'll still get on the green in regulation hitting 7 iron down the fairway 3 times, versus you spraying a driver anywhere but straight, and then you have to hit something from a difficult lie just to recover, which you probably shank into deeper trouble.

 

I see this every week with the guys I play with. They spend 18 holes getting mad at their driver and playing from the woods, and chunking chips and hating their wedges because they can't hit any of them. Give me a 7 iron, PW and putter, and I bet I can beat the bogey golfer with all 14 of his clubs.

 

Something to think about anyway.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

This reminds me of a story of my first year playing golf.  I joined our company golf league on Monday evenings.  My best score all summer for 9 holes was 62.  At the end of the summer they had a 3-club tournament.  Since I couldn't hit any wood very well, I picked 5i, 9i, and putter.  Shot 47.  

 

Sure, I could have eventually played bogey golf with those 3 clubs, but even though I would have achieved a goal, it would seem artificial to me because I wouldn't have done it playing the clubs I should be playing.  Most people start playing golf by wanting to smash the ball as far as they can.  It's fun. It's more fun when they find the ball.  Hit one booming drive straightish, and they are hooked.

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“I generally am short”?.???

I think you need to adjust you gap chart! What good is a gap/distance chart that is “generally” incorrect?

 

Have an honest idea of your lengths.

 

Remember also, you can also nano adjust distances by gripping down, a little will remove 5ish yards, up to 10 if you go all the way to a first finger steel.

I don't know if I would recommend gripping down to a bogey golfer. I think they would still take a 7 iron swing and blade it. They wouldn't realize to adjust their stance. And even if they did the results would still probably be worse 15 feet long. That is a shot that requires a lot of practice to learn how to adjust your stance and swing.
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I don't know if I would recommend gripping down to a bogey golfer. I think they would still take a 7 iron swing and blade it. They wouldn't realize to adjust their stance. And even if they did the results would still probably be worse 15 feet long. That is a shot that requires a lot of practice to learn how to adjust your stance and swing.

I agree.  But of course it depends on the bogey golfer.  A bogey golfer could be a good ball striker, but suck at the short game.

 

The problem with single digit players (myself included) giving recommendations to bogey golfers is that many times what seems easy, is not easy for someone with less skill.  It's all well-intentioned, but is it very helpful?

 

This thread was started by a higher handicap player, but we have not heard much from bogey+ players.  I would like to get some feedback from these players on what they have tried, what worked, what issues they have. Is that the intent of this thread?

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As an tweener - I'm a 5 so I'm half way between a bogey golfer and being a good golfer - I think that much of the advice being given here is good except one exception - the ball that you play matters - get it through your head - the ball that you plays matters -

 

There are three different types of balls - most people should find the urethane covered ball that best fits their game and use it - price isn't so much a factor anymore - you can buy Vice or Snell or hit the second hand sites and get a top quality ball for a reasonable price.  The urethane covered ball provides more options around the green - this isn't about spin on your 5 iron or off the driver - any reasonably good ball will spin about the same off of those clubs - it's all about around the green - so pick a ball, any urethane covered ball and test it around the green - if you like it stick with it for the entire season - do your testing in the late fall to determine if you want to switch to something else for next season -

 

Remember the ball is a piece of equipment used for every shot - It matters - hugely and if you so desire you are good enough, as a bogey golfer, to use the Pro VI or Pro VIx whichever is the better fit.

 

Course management is a big deal - most golfers think they are great at course management - most golfers are not - on average there is about the same gap between the average golfer and touring pros as there is in the other facets of the game.

 

The first step to figuring out good course management is to chart your game - its almost certain that you will discover that you are short of target a significant portion of the time - if not - bully for you but an honest assessment for almost anyone here -even a lower handicap player is that we are mostly short - mishits (which all of us do) produce short shots.  Once you've figured out how to manage that work on how to manage those misses - normally that means short game work - practice your short game twice as much as your long game and you'll see dramatic results -

 

Take lessons if you don't already - don't expect lessons to be a magic bullet - if you are going to do it be sure that you are able to set aside the time necessary to practice what you learn.

 

If you aren't already get fit for your equipment.

 

Get involved in some sort of golf specific fitness program.

 

Those pieces of advice should be good for any of us.

 

But most of all since there has been contrary advice - the ball does matter and you are good enough as a bogey golfer or any golfer except the person playing a hand full of times a year to play a urethane ball because price doesn't come into play any more - it used to but it doesn't now.

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The Rev always makes great points which is why I always enjoy reading his posts.

 

The "take lessons" advice and the "get fitted" advice are points with which it's hard to argue.

 

As to the course management issue, there's no question that most if not all bogie linksters overvalue their own skills in making management decisions. The right decision would doubtlessly improve their scores.

 

But there is another consideration.  Deep down, is the lowest possible score always preferred to playing the game the way one would prefer to play it?  The quick answer might be "yes," but on further consideration, one must consider the possibility that the best way to play is the way that's the most fun.

 

Now to the golf ball.:  right now, it looks like I'm much closer to assisted living than I am to ever playing golf again.  I had a Quixotic dream that I might be able to play wearing my back brace, but just hitting balls and practicing a few putts tells me that if I were a dog or a cat, the humane thing would be to put me down.

 

However, when I was at my very best, an 8 or 9, sometimes even brushing up against 7, I played the universally maligned original Spalding Top Flite, often called, the Rock Flite.  I absolutely loved that ball, the compression of which was too high to advertise.  And I played my best golf with it.

 

So I have to say, Rev, I just don't know.

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I agree. But of course it depends on the bogey golfer. A bogey golfer could be a good ball striker, but suck at the short game.

 

The problem with single digit players (myself included) giving recommendations to bogey golfers is that many times what seems easy, is not easy for someone with less skill. It's all well-intentioned, but is it very helpful?

 

This thread was started by a higher handicap player, but we have not heard much from bogey+ players. I would like to get some feedback from these players on what they have tried, what worked, what issues they have. Is that the intent of this thread?

I'm a bogey player! And your first sentence nailed it. I hit over 60% of fairways consistently with drives 275+ yds, but my short game is atrocious (which I'm realizing more and more). Putting is average (1.9/hole).

 

It's frustrating because I have the potential to be a single digit handicapper, but I just can't seem to put an entire round together. For example, last round I was +1 through 5 holes but ended with a 90. I've also had multiple rounds where I'll drop 5-9 strokes on the back. Going 49-40 or 47-42 is a regular occurrence. (I swear I warm up).

 

I read yesterday that PGA Tour guys are up and down 70% of the time from 50 yrds and in. This is where I struggle and am working to improve. I can't claim to be up and down with that percentage until I'm on the green.

 

What I did to reach this point was:

- took lessons

- use a tracking app like the Grint to find where the misses are

- practice with a purpose

- practice putting inside everyday with a PuttOut.

 

Thanks for reading my $0.02.

 

 

 

Sent from my Nexus 6P using MyGolfSpy mobile app

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It's frustrating because I have the potential to be a single digit handicapper, but I just can't seem to put an entire round together.

You, like me, are a natural for gross Stableford matches.

 

A nuclear hole just means a hole with no points.

 

Meanwhile, you pile up points on the other holes.

 

I've beaten better players than I under those stipulations.

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I'm a bogey player! And your first sentence nailed it. I hit over 60% of fairways consistently with drives 275+ yds, but my short game is atrocious (which I'm realizing more and more). Putting is average (1.9/hole).

 

It's frustrating because I have the potential to be a single digit handicapper, but I just can't seem to put an entire round together. For example, last round I was +1 through 5 holes but ended with a 90. I've also had multiple rounds where I'll drop 5-9 strokes on the back. Going 49-40 or 47-42 is a regular occurrence. (I swear I warm up).

 

I read yesterday that PGA Tour guys are up and down 70% of the time from 50 yrds and in. This is where I struggle and am working to improve. I can't claim to be up and down with that percentage until I'm on the green.

Some of this goes back to expectations, which is being discussed in another current thread.  The best players in the world have bad holes, just not many.  Mid-level players have many more bad holes, and those bad holes are as much a part of their game as the good holes.  Working on your game, improving your weaknesses, will decrease the number of those bad shots and bad holes.

 

But expectations.....on the PGA Tour, scrambling from outside 30 yards, the average is around 30%, and the very best is 50%.  When you move to the range of 10 to 20 yards, the average is around 65%, and the best is 77%.  From inside 10 yards, 86% and 98%.  Obviously from this, at any level, the best way to improve your scrambling is to miss closer to the green.  Yes, improve your short game and putting skills, especially if its a personal weakness, but most people will get more benefit from improving their full swing.

https://www.pgatour.com/stats/categories.RARG_INQ.html

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This reminds me of a story of my first year playing golf.  I joined our company golf league on Monday evenings.  My best score all summer for 9 holes was 62.  At the end of the summer they had a 3-club tournament.  Since I couldn't hit any wood very well, I picked 5i, 9i, and putter.  Shot 47.  

 

Sure, I could have eventually played bogey golf with those 3 clubs, but even though I would have achieved a goal, it would seem artificial to me because I wouldn't have done it playing the clubs I should be playing.  Most people start playing golf by wanting to smash the ball as far as they can.  It's fun. It's more fun when they find the ball.  Hit one booming drive straightish, and they are hooked.

To quote Herm Edwards...

 

14 clubs, 10 clubs, 2 clubs.  Whatever it takes "to win the game."  You can call it artificial if you want, but if by your own admission you played better with 3 clubs then you did with 14, don't you think there is a problem there?  (See my previous post for the answer)

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To quote Herm Edwards...

 

14 clubs, 10 clubs, 2 clubs.  Whatever it takes "to win the game."  You can call it artificial if you want, but if by your own admission you played better with 3 clubs then you did with 14, don't you think there is a problem there?  (See my previous post for the answer)

I love Herm Edwards; great coach! 

I am not saying it doesn't matter.  If I wanted to break 90 for the first time, I would do whatever it takes to do so.  Then I can tell myself that I've done it; I can do it again.  Maybe I'm not like everyone else, but I want to build the skill to do it with the 14 clubs I brought with me.  I want options.  Maybe I can't flop a 60º wedge to a tight pin now, so I'll bump and run a 9i and take a two putt.  It's a good strategy, but I know I will need that flop shot again some day, so I will practice that shot.  

 

I heard a great piece of advice the other day.

"If you can't change your circumstances, change your perspective."   

 

It's applicable to all aspects of life, and it's something golfers rarely do. 

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The one up strategy for me depends on the Pin location and the 'danger zone' around the pin. For instance if the pin is in back - meaning I have a lot of green to work with I'll go with the iron for that distance. On the other hand is the pin is in front and there are bunkers surrounding the front of the green - which in our case is pretty common, I'm going with a longer club. Note: I'd rather have a longer putt than trying to get out of bunkers.

Sounds to me as if .. in general, specific cases aside .. you're playing to the middle of the green? Which - as has been mentioned - is generally a good strategy ... especially for us (myself included!) Bogey (+) golfers.
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Oh, I'd also suggest put the rangefinder away. Use a GPS to give you middle of the green and play to that. Except....*

 

In combination with playing to the middle - learn your consistent and average iron distances. Club up - or down - as your lie, approach angle, elevation change, intervening hazards, wind, contouring of the green, etc etc etc dictate.

 

* Also get an idea of your dispersion pattern - it's not circular like the pros but more oval; tilted to what I understand is a common dispersion for right-handed amateurs .. myself included .. as long-left to short-right. Try to visualize that dispersion pattern overlaid on the green ... eg. try to aim to put the center of your oval over the middle of the green.

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I agree. But of course it depends on the bogey golfer. A bogey golfer could be a good ball striker, but suck at the short game.

 

The problem with single digit players (myself included) giving recommendations to bogey golfers is that many times what seems easy, is not easy for someone with less skill. It's all well-intentioned, but is it very helpful?

This thread was started by a higher handicap player, but we have not heard much from bogey+ players. I would like to get some feedback from these players on what they have tried, what worked, what issues they have. Is that the intent of this thread?

 

Yes, I believe that's part of it. I .. a decidedly bogey+ golfer working to improve .. have the technical skills to score well, but .. one of my personal biggest hurdles out on the course is patience and focus. Don't know if those things can be taught vs acquired over years of golfing experience. And unfortunately I picked up the game way too late in life!

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Oh, I'd also suggest put the rangefinder away. Use a GPS to give you middle of the green and play to that. Except....*

 

In combination with playing to the middle - learn your consistent and average iron distances. Club up - or down - as your lie, approach angle, elevation change, intervening hazards, wind, contouring of the green, etc etc etc dictate.

 

* Also get an idea of your dispersion pattern - it's not circular like the pros but more oval; tilted to what I understand is a common dispersion for right-handed amateurs .. myself included .. as long-left to short-right. Try to visualize that dispersion pattern overlaid on the green ... eg. try to aim to put the center of your oval over the middle of the green.

First two points are spot on. I see so many people get the reading to the flag not care about how far front, middle, or back are and pull out the club that hits that number and then fire away. Turd in tinthe second point they may come up short because they were using the one time they hit that club that distance and ignore the 10 times they didn't. Or they land pin high and it rolls out well past the flag because they don't have a ball flight that holds the green.

 

For the second point also the location of the flag doesn't come into play and that a different shot is probably needed for a middle or back pin compared to a front location

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"Course Management" has been mentioned several times, but...... How does a bogey golfer actually learn it?

 

Experience, of course, and being "mindful" on the course while playing and noting and learning (err, ummm .. TRYING to learn....) from your mistakes. Playing lessons can also be very valuable.

 

Certainly there are any number of online resources; one I've found I think is pretty good is a 10 part series on Plugged In Golf...

https://pluggedingolf.com/course-management-basics-part-1/

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This is the 37th post in this thread, there is a lot of information here, the majority of it being good. However if I was reading this as a golfer it would be way to much to decipher and implement. Part of the problem is the amount of information, the internet is the golfers best friend and worst enemy at the same time. IMO a bogey golfer should focus on one thing and one thing only. Golf is all about eliminating variables. Bogey golfers have more variables than a scratch golfer, whether that is swing, course management or anything else that comes into play. I didn't learn the game in the "traditional' fashion, so it is difficult for me to explain how I am not a bogey golfer. However in teaching my son the game (12 yo) the focus was starting at 100 yards and in and has now moved to 150 in. That is it. I also eliminated variables for him. If he hit it in the bunker, he would take it out and drop behind the bunker for example. It keeps it fun for him and allows him to play shots that factor in the majority of scoring. I guess my point in this ramble is to focus on one thing and one thing only. Once you are comfortable move on to the next thing. I would start from 100 yards in and move from there. I firmly believe that the game of golf should be taught backwards from green to tee. 

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Here's a page from a bogey golfer who decided to improve his game and made a plan to do it....

http://www.chrisyates.org/golf-how-to-break-90-bogey-golf-in-30-days.html

 

A bunch of common-sense tips that have mostly already been covered in this thread, but still an interesting read.

It's an ambitious plan, but it would make all the difference to a bogey+ golfer if they followed it.  I just wonder how many people would.  I'm retired, so I can do this.  I don't do all of it, but I have come close in the past.  The more I work on those shots the better I play... no doubt about it!

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