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Playing Ready Golf


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#1 mudfish

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 03:53 PM

This is not necessarily a rule, but it kinda falls into the golf etiquette category... I've only been golfing for about a year, but one of the first things I made sure to teach myself was the "other" rules of the game... I watched other players, and read as much as I could... this is a good source...


http://www.deeprough...y-golf-america/


Play Ready Golf!

How often have you stood on the tee of a par 3, watching the group in front for what seems to be an eternity? Three of the guys are on the green. One is in the bunker. The guy in the bunker was the last to hit…so he’s also the last to get to the bunker. The other 3 guys are standing around chatting as bunker guy gets his sand wedge…heads over to the bunker…and thinks about not screwing up his sand shot. He hits his sand shot, which flies over the green, into a bunker on the other side of the green. The other 3 guys chuckle, and continue to chat. Bunker guy rakes his bunker (nice job!), walks to the other side of the green…and hits an ok shot that ends up on the green, but he’s still ‘away’. Bunker guy rakes…oops…he forgot his putter in the cart…3 other guys continue to chit chat..and laugh at bunker guy…you really screwed this hole up Charlie! Bunker guy finally putts, makes a great one…saves his 4. And now the other 3, one by one, take their time reading their putts, lining up the putts, hitting their putts…missing...marking their ball… and begin the routine once again. This is absolutely insane.

This is an ‘extreme’ example, but I see it happening in so many different circumstances. People do it on the fairway…one by one, completely serially, people select a club, think about their shot, take some practice swings and then hit the ball…waiting for their playing partner on the complete opposite side of the fairway to hit their ball…watch it fly through the air, and land wherever it went.

You do NOT have to wait for your playing partners.

While the guy is hitting his bunker shot, read your putt…heck, use a golf ball with an alignment mark, and line up your putt. While your playing partner is thinking about his shot out of the rough, you should be selecting your club for your approach shot out of the fairway…you can pick your intermediate target, get a clear image of what you are going to do. Just be READY to step right into your pre-shot routine as soon as the other guy hits.

The Ball is Lost…Forget About It

This doesn’t bother me nearly as much as #1, but if you hook your tee shot into some deep woods, with lots of underbrush…you’re not going to find it. Yes, I understand the rules give you 5 minutes to look…but the vast majority of people take more than that…and for the most part it’s a fruitless effort. Look for a minute or two…if you seriously think you have a reasonable chance of finding it, sure use your 5 minutes. But, come on…if it looks like a Costa Rican jungle…you aren’t going to find the ball, don’t waste any more time looking for it.

Gimme Putts

Unless you’re playing for $100 a hole, please don’t spend 5 minutes lining up your 18″ putt. Tell your playing partner it’s good, and have him pick up. How many times have you watched another 2-5 minutes wasted while the group in front of you is standing in a 5 foot circle surrounding the pin?

Develop a Pre-Shot Routine

If you don’t already have one, work on developing a consistent pre-shot routine. Just don’t make it a 5 minute one that involves 35 waggles, and constant regripping of the club. Mine involves lining up behind the ball, envisioning my shot, walking up to the ball, grip, look up, check alignment, look up…hit. It probably doesn’t take more than 20 seconds. And it’s consistent. I don’t spend minutes hemming and hawing over what to do. Not only does it help speed up play, but it will clear your mind, and help you stay focused.

Leave Your Bags in the Direction of the Next Tee

I don’t see it as often as other slow down mistakes, but it definitely happens. Leave your bags to the side of the green, and in the direction of the next tee, never in front of the green. Nothing worse than watching a slow group take forever to putt out, then all walk back toward me…to get their bags and put away their clubs…then walk BACK over the green toward the next tee.

Play Level Appropriate Tees

I don’t worry about this as much as some people do, but you’re only doing yourself a disservice if you’re a 20 handicap playing off the back tees. But, I’m not going to say that everyone that does it slows down play. If you’re a high handicapper who plays quickly, by all means, torture yourself from the back tees.

Cart Riders…

Two very simple things. First: drop your cart partner off at their ball…then drive to your ball and get ready for your shot. Second: take at least 2 or 3 clubs with you to your ball.

Beginners

Last thing I’ll mention….I’m all for people learning the game…but do it on an executive course or at the driving range. You’ll have a lot more fun on a shorter course, and will have more time to work on your short game, which is the quickest way to start shooting lower scores. However, if you MUST play that 135 slope course, play off the front tees, and pick up your ball if you haven’t reached the green in 5 shots

#2 GolfSpy Dave

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 04:08 PM

Another excellent thread, thanks.
The hardest ones on this list for players to comply with are The Ball is Lost…Forget About It and Play Level Appropriate Tees. The first because of the cost of the ball lost. Really though, someone who is playing golf should take it as a $5 lesson and move on. If you are losing $5 balls, then it may be time to downgrade to one with less spin anyway.

The tees one is harder because of ego. I am sure we can all talk about the tee experience. I don't play back tees. I look at the rating and slope to figure out which tees are under par. We have all seen Billy Back tees.

http://www.facebook....p?v=93595894200
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#3 jamo

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 04:58 PM

We have all seen Billy Back tees.

http://www.facebook....p?v=93595894200


Actually I never have seen that, it's a good video. He really shouldn't play the back tees, especially at that course, there are a lot of forced carries.

#4 Addicted2Golf

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 06:26 PM

Another excellent thread, thanks.
The hardest ones on this list for players to comply with are The Ball is Lost…Forget About It and Play Level Appropriate Tees. The first because of the cost of the ball lost. Really though, someone who is playing golf should take it as a $5 lesson and move on. If you are losing $5 balls, then it may be time to downgrade to one with less spin anyway.

The tees one is harder because of ego. I am sure we can all talk about the tee experience. I don't play back tees. I look at the rating and slope to figure out which tees are under par. We have all seen Billy Back tees.

http://www.facebook....p?v=93595894200


GREAT video Sactown! Thanks for that.

6,500 yards is plenty for the recreational golfer. In fact, I read that course designers are beginning to recognize that building shorter courses are better for the environment, cheaper to build and maintain, and more suited to play by families. The economic impacts to the golf industry has everyone thinking differently. Sorry, a little off tangent but the comment about the length of the back tees reminded of the article I read.
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Cobra Baffler Rail F Fairway 15.5* Fujikura Motore
Wilson FYbrid 19* UST Proforce AXIV Core
Cobra Baffler Rail H Hybrid 22* Fujikura Motore
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#5 Addicted2Golf

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 06:32 PM

Beginners

Last thing I’ll mention….I’m all for people learning the game…but do it on an executive course or at the driving range. You’ll have a lot more fun on a shorter course, and will have more time to work on your short game, which is the quickest way to start shooting lower scores. However, if you MUST play that 135 slope course, play off the front tees, and pick up your ball if you haven’t reached the green in 5 shots


I agree with most of what you said except the above comment. We shouldn't banish novices to par 3 courses or the practice tee. I have no problem with beginners playing with me provided they:

1) Play from the appropriate tees
2) Pick up their ball if they are slowing down play to the point where the group behind is waiting for an extended period of time
3) Make an attempt to learn and practice proper etiquette on the course and be respectful of their surroundings

I play with a co-worker who is just starting out and he does all these things. We have a great time and very rarely are we called on slow play by the rangers or other groups.
Callaway FT-9 Driver 10.5* Grafalloy Prolaunch Axis Blue
Callaway FT-9 Driver 9.0* Grafalloy Prolaunch Platinum
Cobra Baffler Rail F Fairway 15.5* Fujikura Motore
Wilson FYbrid 19* UST Proforce AXIV Core
Cobra Baffler Rail H Hybrid 22* Fujikura Motore
Ping I15 Irons 5-UW AWT
Ping Tour-W 56*,60* DG Spinner
Ping Redwood ZB Putter, WRX Starshot, 35"

#6 GolfSpy Dave

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 06:38 PM

I agree with most of what you said except the above comment. We shouldn't banish novices to par 3 courses or the practice tee. I have no problem with beginners playing with me provided they:

1) Play from the appropriate tees
2) Pick up their ball if they are slowing down play to the point where the group behind is waiting for an extended period of time
3) Make an attempt to learn and practice proper etiquette on the course and be respectful of their surroundings

I play with a co-worker who is just starting out and he does all these things. We have a great time and very rarely are we called on slow play by the rangers or other groups.

And I think that this all comes down to keeping pace of play. Beginners will only find conflict on the course when they slow down play. Waiting on a foursome to find four balls, or to watch each other hit is death on a busy day. This lesson should be first.

On any given day, my game sucks, but I refuse to be slow and suck. If I lose a ball. I look for it for a few minutes, then drop and move on. Take the strokes and move on. That is the game.
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#7 HoosierGolfer

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 08:27 PM

I said many years ago that slow play is the cancer of golf. If everyone would read this thread, the game would be a whole lot more fun at times.

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#8 mudfish

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 08:50 PM

I agree with most of what you said except the above comment. We shouldn't banish novices to par 3 courses or the practice tee. I have no problem with beginners playing with me provided they:

1) Play from the appropriate tees
2) Pick up their ball if they are slowing down play to the point where the group behind is waiting for an extended period of time
3) Make an attempt to learn and practice proper etiquette on the course and be respectful of their surroundings

I play with a co-worker who is just starting out and he does all these things. We have a great time and very rarely are we called on slow play by the rangers or other groups.



I agree since I'm a beginner... I've played many courses that are better than me, and I believe they helped me get better... as long as you are aware of the other player in your group, and the groups behind you, and you keep a pace consistent with the rest of the course, there is no need to keep yourself isolated...

#9 Matt Saternus

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 09:07 PM

I agree with most of what you said except the above comment. We shouldn't banish novices to par 3 courses or the practice tee. I have no problem with beginners playing with me provided they:

1) Play from the appropriate tees
2) Pick up their ball if they are slowing down play to the point where the group behind is waiting for an extended period of time
3) Make an attempt to learn and practice proper etiquette on the course and be respectful of their surroundings

I play with a co-worker who is just starting out and he does all these things. We have a great time and very rarely are we called on slow play by the rangers or other groups.


Agree 100%, don't banish beginners. Personally, I like executive and par 3 courses, it's something different and it helps you look at different aspects of you game, but there's no reason a beginner can't play where they want to. My brother is just getting started but he golf at Kalaplua with us and didn't hold up play a bit.

That said, I'm not a big "slow play is the worst sin in the world" kind of guy. I think it's a lot like driving: everyone thinks the appropriate pace of play/speed to drive is just as fast as they want to go. I'm not in favor of 6 hours rounds, but on a packed course, 4.5 or 5 hours is to be expected. Just enjoy being outside.

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#10 jamo

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 10:08 PM

I guess I could think of worse things to do then play golf for 6 hours, so maybe slow play isn't all bad. What is bad is when slow players don't let you play through.

#11 GolfSpy Dave

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 10:26 PM

I guess I could think of worse things to do then play golf for 6 hours, so maybe slow play isn't all bad. What is bad is when slow players don't let you play through.

That is a lack of courtesy, but if they are slow, be sure there is not a group in front of them.
Personally, I would be and have been angry with a 6 hour round. You are not playing golf for six hours, you are sitting in a tee box waiting for 3.5 of those hours.
Maybe you were lucky enough to spend $80 to wait too. Playing golf means swinging clubs at balls to me.
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#12 NGage

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 10:35 PM

Another excellent thread, thanks.
The hardest ones on this list for players to comply with are The Ball is Lost…Forget About It


If my score matters...the rules give me five minutes, and I'm using five minutes.

#13 GolfSpy Dave

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 10:39 PM

If my score matters...the rules give me five minutes, and I'm using five minutes.

5 is fine for a round that is being scored. It is the ones who do not drop a new one, ever. 15-20 minutes for a Noodle!
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#14 NGage

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Posted 13 March 2010 - 10:39 PM

We have all seen Billy Back tees.

http://www.facebook....p?v=93595894200


That's funny. ;)

Billy Backtees would be a good screen-name. :lol:

#15 Matt Saternus

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Posted 14 March 2010 - 01:03 AM

That is a lack of courtesy, but if they are slow, be sure there is not a group in front of them.
Personally, I would be and have been angry with a 6 hour round. You are not playing golf for six hours, you are sitting in a tee box waiting for 3.5 of those hours.
Maybe you were lucky enough to spend $80 to wait too. Playing golf means swinging clubs at balls to me.


Totally agree, 6 hours is way over the line, and you need to let faster groups through. I just dislike the people on the course who are screaming at you the minute they have to wait on a tee box, whether its your fault or not.

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