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... I played with a couple about my age and their 30 something son yesterday. Nice people but a long front 9 as I own waited for the 3 of them to hit 10 shots before I hit my second. To their credit they moved along not taking practice swings and did not hold me up excessively. Ryan, the son hit some good shots but many poor shots. He wanted to know why he hit so many bad shots but had some really good shots and just didn't understand why. I told him he would not like the answer but he still wanted to hear it. Fair enough. 

... If you have some abilities from good hand eye coordination to just having played a lot and can hit the ball solidly at times, you will hit some good shots. Butif you have fundamental flaws you will always struggle with consistency. The truth is that on any given swing, you can overcome your swing flaws and hit good shots. If you wonder why you hit some good shots but more bad ones, the answer is your good shots are the anomaly because you were able to over come your flaw for that one swing. Obviously that is not sustainable. Ryan had used a tip from a golf magazine to tie his arms to the side of his chest, linking his arms and body. In theory that can work but Ryan was swinging too hard and using his body way too much with the club trailing so his ball striking was inconsistent. He wanted to know how he can sync up his arms and body without over using one or the other and I said "LOL, don't we all!" This is what makes the golf swing so elusive and why JB Holmes, in contention to win the Open Championship, said his swing was feeling great and he didn't have to think about it, just what shots he wanted to hit. I think they all came crashing down Sunday. Yes, even the best players in the world struggle with their flaws and demons. Exactly why most have swing coaches to let them know when their flaw is starting to creep back into their swing.

... The point of this lesson is, we all have swing flaws that we have to over come to play good golf. If you know your swing flaw it is a constant battle to kept it at bay. After 2 back surgeries, my back (body) can get tight without me realizing it and I begin to slightly overuse my body. I am aware of this and some days it is a battle and some days it is non existent. But if you don't know your swing flaw, you will struggle every round you play. Do not concentrate on the good shots attempting to figure out how you hit them and then repeat it. It is not repeatable because you have overcome a flaw to hit that good shot. As an example, Ryan would flip his wrists thru impact to counter over using his body with his hands lagging behind causing poor contact and an open face. By flipping his wrists on the few good shots he hit, he overcame poor timing and basically got lucky. I would add he also flipped his wrists and hit some low hooks and a few topped shots as well so obviously wrist flipping was not the answer. 

... So if you hit more poor shots than good shots, stop wondering why you can't repeat those "good swings" because they probably aren't good swings, more likely it was just an in swing non repeatable adjustment to overcome your flaw. If you don't know your flaw, it would be a good idea to take a lesson and have a professional help diagnose your swing flaw and help you find a way to improve it. Even then, your flaw has a way of creeping back into your swing so it is a constant battle but at least you know the enemy and can eliminate it for periods of time or at least keep it at bay.  

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I have more than one flaw.

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41 minutes ago, Kenny B said:

I have more than one flaw.

 

... It is 2019. Learn to multitask. 🤣

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5 hours ago, chisag said:

If you don't know your flaw, it would be a good idea to take a lesson and have a professional help diagnose your swing flaw and help you find a way to improve it.

Sounds really dumb I know, but I'm afraid of hearing what they are 😂.  My last experience with lessons, well over 30 years ago, had my game so screwed up, and me so frustrated, I nearly quit playing.  At this point in my life, I've adopted the Clint Eastwood school of golf... a man's got to know his limitations

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Great post chisag. Ive had two types of instructors in my years. One who fixes everything before and sometimes after impact that fixes impact. And others who just focus on impact only. What type do you feel would improve the player Ryan from your post?

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16 hours ago, Big money said:

Great post chisag. Ive had two types of instructors in my years. One who fixes everything before and sometimes after impact that fixes impact. And others who just focus on impact only. What type do you feel would improve the player Ryan from your post?

 

... It is always difficult to have a recommendation without working with someone directly because we all process information differently. One thing is for sure,  he needs to relax both his body and his mind. The golf swing is almost always easier and less complicated than we make it out to be. I would definitely find a few drills that clicked with him and start from there. I am a big believer in fixing one thing at a time and even then I preferred to enhance as opposed to re-construct. 

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I followed the "fix it" approach for 20 plus years.  I got better for a while, if I hit thousands of balls and worked really hard, but ultimately I regressed.  The "fix it" approach lead primarily to frustration and exhaustion.

 

I much prefer the learning approach advocated by coaches like Fred Shoemaker, Tim Galloway,  Sam Jarman, Lynn Marriot and Pia Nilsson.     

 

 

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20 minutes ago, alfriday101 said:

I followed the "fix it" approach for 20 plus years.  I got better for a while, if I hit thousands of balls and worked really hard, but ultimately I regressed.  The "fix it" approach lead primarily to frustration and exhaustion.

I much prefer the learning approach advocated by coaches like Fred Shoemaker, Tim Galloway,  Sam Jarman, Lynn Marriot and Pia Nilsson.     

 

... I am not sure what you mean by "fix it". 

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