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How do I take my Ping app numbers and pick a putter???

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So, I’ve done and Edel fitting and saw some great gains with my aim very soon after, which is the goal of the fitting. I sent video to SeeMore and gave them the specs from my Edel putter, and even a SAM session at Cub Champion, and bought the Si2, which has given me better distance control than my Edel. Now I watched putter fittings at Ping that are on YouTube and the Ping app, using the Ping putter cradle, was used to look at many swing and stroke factors, then they use Quintic to finalize the fitting, which is the tech TXG uses in their videos.
 
Well, now that I have the hard numbers from the Ping app, it says Slight-Arc (Ping putters are labeled with stickers to identify stroke-type they fit), 20* from vertical lie angle, and Black (standard) color code, but how do I pick between a mallet of standard head, counter-weighted or not???? I’m at a loss how one takes these numbers and picks a head/weighting. Edel teaches that head shapes and lines affect aim... My miss with putters is generally left. Is that because of the shape, lines, etc, or the neck, length, etc???
 
How have you used your numbers, or info from fittings to pick a putter??? I fully believe putters should be fitted first. Just not sure what to do here...
 
 
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17 minutes ago, PMookie said:

 

So, I’ve done and Edel fitting and saw some great gains with my aim very soon after, which is the goal of the fitting. I sent video to SeeMore and gave them the specs from my Edel putter, and even a SAM session at Cub Champion, and bought the Si2, which has given me better distance control than my Edel. Now I watched putter fittings at Ping that are on YouTube and the Ping app was used to look at many swing and stroke factors, then they use Quintic to finalize the fitting, which is the tech TXG uses in their videos.

 

Well, now that I have the hard numbers from the Ping app, it says Slight-Arc, 20* from vertical lie angle, and Black (standard) color code, but how do I pick between a mallet of standard head, counter-weighted or not???? I’m at a loss how one takes these numbers and picks a head/weighting. Edel teaches that head shapes and lines affect aim... My miss with putters is generally left. Is that because of the shape, lines, etc, or the neck, length, etc???

 

How have you used your numbers, or info from fittings to pick a putter??? I fully believe putters should be fitted first. Just not sure what to do here...

 

 

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I didn't know about the ping fitting tool. I just ran it and got the blue dot. Which apparently means I need 1º upright and based on my height I also need + 1/2 inch length. I currently play standard...If I were to go get my current irons bent and extended can I expect measurable impact without the time restraint and formality of a fitting? Basically I'm asking how accurate the tool is...

Also sorry @PMookie for not even coming close to posting something relevant to putter fittings and also possibly thread jacking. 

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I didn't know about the ping fitting tool. I just ran it and got the blue dot. Which apparently means I need 1º upright and based on my height I also need + 1/2 inch length. I currently play standard...If I were to go get my current irons bent and extended can I expect measurable impact without the time restraint and formality of a fitting? Basically I'm asking how accurate the tool is...
Also sorry [mention=2567]PMookie[/mention] for not even coming close to posting something relevant to putter fittings and also possibly thread jacking. 

It’s not an online tool, it’s the putting app, and it’s used in conjunction with the Ping putting cradle to give readouts based on 5 putts.


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7 minutes ago, PMookie said:


It’s not an online tool, it’s the putting app, and it’s used in conjunction with the Ping putting cradle to give readouts based on 5 putts.


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Apologies, I found the nflight tool which gives putter recommendations and assumed it was the same thing. 

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Well, now that I have the hard numbers from the Ping app, it says Slight-Arc, 20* from vertical lie angle, and Black (standard) color code, but how do I pick between a mallet of standard head, counter-weighted or not???? I’m at a loss how one takes these numbers and picks a head/weighting. Edel teaches that head shapes and lines affect aim... My miss with putters is generally left. Is that because of the shape, lines, etc, or the neck, length, etc???
 
How have you used your numbers, or info from fittings to pick a putter??? I fully believe putters should be fitted first. Just not sure what to do here...
 
 
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If you look at the new Ping putters, they will have a sticker on the shaft that denotes “arc” “slight arc” or “straight back” ......you can then match the app with the putter.


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Cobra Connect Bag: Cobra F8 Driver(10.5*) 3-4W(14.5*) & 5-6W(18.5*)w/Mitsubishi Tensei ck Blue Regular; Cobra F8 3 Hybrid, 5 Hybrid & 6-PW, Gw(49*) SW(54*) LW(58*) all w/UST Mamiya Recoil 460 ES regular shafts. Lamkin Cobra Connect grips with Arccoss tracking sensors. Putter: Evnroll ER6 33”. Bag: Cobra Ultralite Cart Bag(Peacoat/Silver).

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If you look at the new Ping putters, they will have a sticker on the shaft that denotes “arc” “slight arc” or “straight back” ......you can then match the app with the putter.


Sent from my iPad using MyGolfSpy
Cobra Connect Bag: Cobra F8 Driver(10.5*) 3-4W(14.5*) & 5-6W(18.5*)w/Mitsubishi Tensei ck Blue Regular; Cobra F8 3 Hybrid, 5 Hybrid & 6-PW, Gw(49*) SW(54*) LW(58*) all w/UST Mamiya Recoil 460 ES regular shafts. Lamkin Cobra Connect grips with Arccoss tracking sensors. Putter: Evnroll ER6 33”. Bag: Cobra Ultralite Cart Bag(Peacoat/Silver).


Right, I knew that, but picking a putter is more than that. Counterweighting vs standard weighting, mallet vs standard heads, etc. Strokes are affected by head weight, etc, so that’s where I’m looking for answers.


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Here are pics of what the Ping app gives you:
IMG_8241.jpgIMG_8242.jpgIMG_8243.jpgIMG_8244.jpg


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Here are pics of what the Ping app gives you:
IMG_8241.thumb.jpg.d6b8c8f7c1b495c6fb76f5798a4f1c2a.jpgIMG_8242.thumb.jpg.c494c97adadd15439c2a3e3b3c203e9c.jpgIMG_8243.thumb.jpg.ae2ab26df891b3853781135de4c2202a.jpgIMG_8244.thumb.jpg.4fbd377f1b147f39a879b5963b62efc8.jpg


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It looks like as you stay in that 20* toe hang configuration and correct lie angle then mallet vs blade/answer style is really a matter of your own personal preference- at least according to Ping. Would really love to know if Edel fits you into a totally different framework. Is there a reason you're not going to just buy a Ping putter using their specs?

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It looks like as you stay in that 20* toe hang configuration and correct lie angle then mallet vs blade/answer style is really a matter of your own personal preference- at least according to Ping. Would really love to know if Edel fits you into a totally different framework. Is there a reason you're not going to just buy a Ping putter using their specs?

 

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When I went to the Ping page to look at putters that have slight-arc, there are comments made about head weight and “it’s a good choice for smoother tempo players”, and “good on short putts”. Well what numbers constitute “smooth tempo”???

Then add-in how the Ping fitters on YouTube use other factors like video, and putting to a cup a certain distance away, and it lets me know the Ping App numbers are incomplete. Things like the speed of greens one plays has to factor in overall weight, or what length should I play? Etc.

 

 

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When I went to the Ping page to look at putters that have slight-arc, there are comments made about head weight and “it’s a good choice for smoother tempo players”, and “good on short putts”. Well what numbers constitute “smooth tempo”???
Then add-in how the Ping fitters on YouTube use other factors like video, and putting to a cup a certain distance away, and it lets me know the Ping App numbers are incomplete. Things like the speed of greens one plays has to factor in overall weight, or what length should I play? Etc.
 
 
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I hear ya. That stuff is hard to quantify. I guess smooth tempo could translate to someone more comfortable on faster greens which would mean a heavier putter or at least a softer feeling putter. I think of brisk tempo as someone who likes to hit putts instead of feed them.
If you have a 4 footer with a little break in it do you jam it in or play the break? That probably tells you a lot about what you're looking for

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1 hour ago, PMookie said:

When I went to the Ping page to look at putters that have slight-arc, there are comments made about head weight and “it’s a good choice for smoother tempo players”, and “good on short putts”. Well what numbers constitute “smooth tempo”???

Then add-in how the Ping fitters on YouTube use other factors like video, and putting to a cup a certain distance away, and it lets me know the Ping App numbers are incomplete. Things like the speed of greens one plays has to factor in overall weight, or what length should I play? Etc.

 

 

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This is last years Tempo chart, I couldn't find this years. It gives you an idea of what models fit what stroke though. 

 

IMG_0425.PNG

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I’ll post my thoughts later. Probably going to be a long post and would be too difficult on a phone; need a real keyboard.

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This is last years Tempo chart, I couldn't find this years. It gives you an idea of what models fit what stroke though. 
 
IMG_0425.PNG.326e328ff49d1b1f52442f31e08f7824.PNG

Awesome, thanks! It has the tempo numbers out to the right, so that helps.


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There are lots of thoughts and opinions on fitting a putter; probably more than fitting full swing clubs.   Some of the schools of thought are:

1.  Putting is a feel thing,  it is a small stroke and you don't need to be fit.  This school of thought works and is probably more for people that like to feel the head of the putter and how it swings through the stroke.  They don't want numbers or analytics,  they judge putters by looks and feel.  Meaning when they are faced with a 10 foot putt,  they use their senses to determine how to swing the club.  There have been lots of successful players that use this approach.  They will probably stick with a putter for a long time.

2.  Based on your line of questioning, you probably fall into the more analytical approach and want to understand how putting works and be fit into a putter.   There are multiple ways to fit a putter.  Some of them you have already experienced:

a.  Edel -  They fit based on aim and how you setup to the ball to ultimately set your putter square to the target line.  Once they have accomplished that,  they tweak the weight of the putter to smooth out the stroke to get you to roll the ball the same distance.  They are fitting to the feel side of putting.

b.  Seemore - They fit you to a putting approach.  Basically they designed a putter that is supposed to setup square to the target line and you are supposed to have a neutral stance and setup to try and return the putter to the same position. 

c.  Fitting systems such as Quintic, Puttlab, iPing, Tomi, etc.  -  These systems measure the parameters of your stroke and try to figure out they style and design of the putter.  They all do basically the same thing,  they just measure things a little differently and label them differently.  For example on iPing when they talk about slight arc, strong arc, etc.; they are talking about putter rotation and not the path the putter takes.  Each has some algorithms that will help fit you to a putter based on what it considers optimal.  Remember someone programmed these devices to analyze and make a recommendation.  Is that recommendation right?  You have to try the putters to find out.   And from what I have heard,  if you change to the recommended putter,  it may recommend something else for you.  

d.  other approaches - Based on setup or vision.  Odyssey used to fit putters based on how far you stood from the ball the farther away,  the more toe hang you needed; eyes over ball meant face balanced.   My instructor fits based on vision.  You can find a video on youtube with Mike Malaska and be better golf talking about this approach.   In this approach you figure out how you best see the line to eliminate the issue of parallax.   Why do you want to do this?  Because the subconscious likes to take over and steer the ball based on what you really see; which is off due to parallax issues.   Here is a putting study that kind of talks about this issue:  https://www.adamyounggolf.com/putting-study/ .   Once you are setup for vision,  you then search for the putter that helps you roll the ball best.   What does that mean?  You need to be able to roll the ball at a particular speed and on a particular line to make a putt.  There are multiple speed and line combinations,  but you need to be able to execute that.   Do you putt better with putters that are hotter off the face or that are slower off the face?  This will impact your decision on inserts and groove patterns.  How far away from the ball you stand will influence the arc the putter travels on and the putter will rotate more or less to stay square to that arc.  You also need to consider if you stand open or closed to the line.  If you are open to the line you may need a putter that remains open to the line to start your putt on the intended line.  If you are closed you may need a putter that is closed to the line.  This is where the design characteristics of a putter have influence such as CoG, MOI,  toe hang, weight, offset, etc.  How you swing the putter: arms, shoulders, one arm over the other will even influence the putters path and your putter needs.  

My non professional analysis is:

Looking back at your iPing numbers we see the following: slight arc (rotation), slightly closed at impact (but that looks like it is based on 1 of 5,  most seem pretty close to square at impact), back swing tempo varies a little, shaft leans back at impact (ball forward or hitting up on ball maybe??), tempo is 1.8:1 which is close to the theoretical 2:1 ideal, and you need a 70* lie angle.  Base on the hands back,  you want to deloft your putter which is why the 2* recommendation.

The next question is what do you think about when you are putting?  Are you person that likes to feel the head rotate and move the head of the putter, or do you focus on the weight of the putter and feel like you are moving your hands/shaft?  The first may prefer a blade while the later a mallet.  

Based on the varying backswing tempo,  I am guessing you miss short and long and the you occasionally pull the ball?   Maybe I am wrong and if I am, what is your miss pattern?  I know you are tall,  but with a 37" putter,  you are probably standing a little bit off the ball.

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There are lots of thoughts and opinions on fitting a putter; probably more than fitting full swing clubs.   Some of the schools of thought are:
1.  Putting is a feel thing,  it is a small stroke and you don't need to be fit.  This school of thought works and is probably more for people that like to feel the head of the putter and how it swings through the stroke.  They don't want numbers or analytics,  they judge putters by looks and feel.  Meaning when they are faced with a 10 foot putt,  they use their senses to determine how to swing the club.  There have been lots of successful players that use this approach.  They will probably stick with a putter for a long time.
2.  Based on your line of questioning, you probably fall into the more analytical approach and want to understand how putting works and be fit into a putter.   There are multiple ways to fit a putter.  Some of them you have already experienced:
a.  Edel -  They fit based on aim and how you setup to the ball to ultimately set your putter square to the target line.  Once they have accomplished that,  they tweak the weight of the putter to smooth out the stroke to get you to roll the ball the same distance.  They are fitting to the feel side of putting.
b.  Seemore - They fit you to a putting approach.  Basically they designed a putter that is supposed to setup square to the target line and you are supposed to have a neutral stance and setup to try and return the putter to the same position. 
c.  Fitting systems such as Quintic, Puttlab, iPing, Tomi, etc.  -  These systems measure the parameters of your stroke and try to figure out they style and design of the putter.  They all do basically the same thing,  they just measure things a little differently and label them differently.  For example on iPing when they talk about slight arc, strong arc, etc.; they are talking about putter rotation and not the path the putter takes.  Each has some algorithms that will help fit you to a putter based on what it considers optimal.  Remember someone programmed these devices to analyze and make a recommendation.  Is that recommendation right?  You have to try the putters to find out.   And from what I have heard,  if you change to the recommended putter,  it may recommend something else for you.  
d.  other approaches - Based on setup or vision.  Odyssey used to fit putters based on how far you stood from the ball the farther away,  the more toe hang you needed; eyes over ball meant face balanced.   My instructor fits based on vision.  You can find a video on youtube with Mike Malaska and be better golf talking about this approach.   In this approach you figure out how you best see the line to eliminate the issue of parallax.   Why do you want to do this?  Because the subconscious likes to take over and steer the ball based on what you really see; which is off due to parallax issues.   Here is a putting study that kind of talks about this issue:  https://www.adamyounggolf.com/putting-study/ .   Once you are setup for vision,  you then search for the putter that helps you roll the ball best.   What does that mean?  You need to be able to roll the ball at a particular speed and on a particular line to make a putt.  There are multiple speed and line combinations,  but you need to be able to execute that.   Do you putt better with putters that are hotter off the face or that are slower off the face?  This will impact your decision on inserts and groove patterns.  How far away from the ball you stand will influence the arc the putter travels on and the putter will rotate more or less to stay square to that arc.  You also need to consider if you stand open or closed to the line.  If you are open to the line you may need a putter that remains open to the line to start your putt on the intended line.  If you are closed you may need a putter that is closed to the line.  This is where the design characteristics of a putter have influence such as CoG, MOI,  toe hang, weight, offset, etc.  How you swing the putter: arms, shoulders, one arm over the other will even influence the putters path and your putter needs.  
My non professional analysis is:
Looking back at your iPing numbers we see the following: slight arc (rotation), slightly closed at impact (but that looks like it is based on 1 of 5,  most seem pretty close to square at impact), back swing tempo varies a little, shaft leans back at impact (ball forward or hitting up on ball maybe??), tempo is 1.8:1 which is close to the theoretical 2:1 ideal, and you need a 70* lie angle.  Base on the hands back,  you want to deloft your putter which is why the 2* recommendation.
The next question is what do you think about when you are putting?  Are you person that likes to feel the head rotate and move the head of the putter, or do you focus on the weight of the putter and feel like you are moving your hands/shaft?  The first may prefer a blade while the later a mallet.  
Based on the varying backswing tempo,  I am guessing you miss short and long and the you occasionally pull the ball?   Maybe I am wrong and if I am, what is your miss pattern?  I know you are tall,  but with a 37" putter,  you are probably standing a little bit off the ball.

Yep, miss is left, as can happen when adding loft at impact (hands back), and toe closes. I’m almost ALWAYS short on missed putts. I’m always trying to “die the ball in the hole”. I’m more of a feel the head weight of the putter. I’ve always liked a “heavier” putter, even counter-balanced, but it may not have been best for me. Ever since the Edel fitting, I think about head shape, and the lines and how those affect my aim... SeeMore fit me based on video of my swing, my SAM numbers, and my Edel specs, and I’m better with speed with my Si2 vs my Edel. I like the look of mallets better, but I’ve only tried the Ketsch (hated the feel), and the 10k Evnroll ER9 (speed/touch was horrible).
What affects “distance”, or the feel of proper speed into the ball to make to ball go a certain distance? Would a harder face be better? I prefer a softer insert (maybe affecting my distance judgement).
My stroke is very inconsistent and has a “loop” in it. I have a VERY hard time not being “handsy”, or swinging with just my shoulders/torso.
Anyway, when I’m in a store and grab a putter, I’m convinced that the shape/lines affect why I miss left. No idea on how long my putter SHOULD be, etc, etc, etc.


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There are lots of thoughts and opinions on fitting a putter; probably more than fitting full swing clubs.   Some of the schools of thought are:
1.  Putting is a feel thing,  it is a small stroke and you don't need to be fit.  This school of thought works and is probably more for people that like to feel the head of the putter and how it swings through the stroke.  They don't want numbers or analytics,  they judge putters by looks and feel.  Meaning when they are faced with a 10 foot putt,  they use their senses to determine how to swing the club.  There have been lots of successful players that use this approach.  They will probably stick with a putter for a long time.
2.  Based on your line of questioning, you probably fall into the more analytical approach and want to understand how putting works and be fit into a putter.   There are multiple ways to fit a putter.  Some of them you have already experienced:
a.  Edel -  They fit based on aim and how you setup to the ball to ultimately set your putter square to the target line.  Once they have accomplished that,  they tweak the weight of the putter to smooth out the stroke to get you to roll the ball the same distance.  They are fitting to the feel side of putting.
b.  Seemore - They fit you to a putting approach.  Basically they designed a putter that is supposed to setup square to the target line and you are supposed to have a neutral stance and setup to try and return the putter to the same position. 
c.  Fitting systems such as Quintic, Puttlab, iPing, Tomi, etc.  -  These systems measure the parameters of your stroke and try to figure out they style and design of the putter.  They all do basically the same thing,  they just measure things a little differently and label them differently.  For example on iPing when they talk about slight arc, strong arc, etc.; they are talking about putter rotation and not the path the putter takes.  Each has some algorithms that will help fit you to a putter based on what it considers optimal.  Remember someone programmed these devices to analyze and make a recommendation.  Is that recommendation right?  You have to try the putters to find out.   And from what I have heard,  if you change to the recommended putter,  it may recommend something else for you.  
d.  other approaches - Based on setup or vision.  Odyssey used to fit putters based on how far you stood from the ball the farther away,  the more toe hang you needed; eyes over ball meant face balanced.   My instructor fits based on vision.  You can find a video on youtube with Mike Malaska and be better golf talking about this approach.   In this approach you figure out how you best see the line to eliminate the issue of parallax.   Why do you want to do this?  Because the subconscious likes to take over and steer the ball based on what you really see; which is off due to parallax issues.   Here is a putting study that kind of talks about this issue:  https://www.adamyounggolf.com/putting-study/ .   Once you are setup for vision,  you then search for the putter that helps you roll the ball best.   What does that mean?  You need to be able to roll the ball at a particular speed and on a particular line to make a putt.  There are multiple speed and line combinations,  but you need to be able to execute that.   Do you putt better with putters that are hotter off the face or that are slower off the face?  This will impact your decision on inserts and groove patterns.  How far away from the ball you stand will influence the arc the putter travels on and the putter will rotate more or less to stay square to that arc.  You also need to consider if you stand open or closed to the line.  If you are open to the line you may need a putter that remains open to the line to start your putt on the intended line.  If you are closed you may need a putter that is closed to the line.  This is where the design characteristics of a putter have influence such as CoG, MOI,  toe hang, weight, offset, etc.  How you swing the putter: arms, shoulders, one arm over the other will even influence the putters path and your putter needs.  
My non professional analysis is:
Looking back at your iPing numbers we see the following: slight arc (rotation), slightly closed at impact (but that looks like it is based on 1 of 5,  most seem pretty close to square at impact), back swing tempo varies a little, shaft leans back at impact (ball forward or hitting up on ball maybe??), tempo is 1.8:1 which is close to the theoretical 2:1 ideal, and you need a 70* lie angle.  Base on the hands back,  you want to deloft your putter which is why the 2* recommendation.
The next question is what do you think about when you are putting?  Are you person that likes to feel the head rotate and move the head of the putter, or do you focus on the weight of the putter and feel like you are moving your hands/shaft?  The first may prefer a blade while the later a mallet.  
Based on the varying backswing tempo,  I am guessing you miss short and long and the you occasionally pull the ball?   Maybe I am wrong and if I am, what is your miss pattern?  I know you are tall,  but with a 37" putter,  you are probably standing a little bit off the ball.

I’ve seen that Malaska video on the parallax, but I never figured out how to do it.


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1 hour ago, PMookie said:


Yep, miss is left, as can happen when adding loft at impact (hands back), and toe closes. I’m almost ALWAYS short on missed putts. I’m always trying to “die the ball in the hole”. I’m more of a feel the head weight of the putter. I’ve always liked a “heavier” putter, even counter-balanced, but it may not have been best for me. Ever since the Edel fitting, I think about head shape, and the lines and how those affect my aim... SeeMore fit me based on video of my swing, my SAM numbers, and my Edel specs, and I’m better with speed with my Si2 vs my Edel. I like the look of mallets better, but I’ve only tried the Ketsch (hated the feel), and the 10k Evnroll ER9 (speed/touch was horrible).
What affects “distance”, or the feel of proper speed into the ball to make to ball go a certain distance? Would a harder face be better? I prefer a softer insert (maybe affecting my distance judgement).
My stroke is very inconsistent and has a “loop” in it. I have a VERY hard time not being “handsy”, or swinging with just my shoulders/torso.
Anyway, when I’m in a store and grab a putter, I’m convinced that the shape/lines affect why I miss left. No idea on how long my putter SHOULD be, etc, etc, etc.

 

Everything I am going to post is my thoughts and what I have learned.  Some will agree others won't.  

1.  my thoughts on aim are that I want consistent aim which could be open or closed to the target line as long as I do the same thing consistently.  The ball will primarily go in the direction the face points at impact so I want to make sure that my impact position is correct and the ball starts on the correct line.  

2.  what affects distance.  Lots of things.  Tempo;  a slower tempo will need a longer swing to make the ball go the same distance as a faster tempo.  Missing the center of the face impact distance.  The face isn't as big of an issue,  but putters like an evnroll or Ketsch will create slower ball speeds because of the grooves.  There is less face at the center so less energy is transferred to the ball; as you move out to the center there is more material so more energy to make the ball roll farther.  You just need to work with your putter to see how far it rolls the ball and learn that feel or stroke length to make the ball go a specific distance.  

3.  to work on your stroke you can use of templates like the visio template and use tees to help train your putters path.  Lots of ways to swing a putter:  left hand/side dominant, right hand/side dominant, shoulder driven,  arms with passive shoulders.  All I can say is try them and see what works best for you.  Sorry,  don't have a lot of ideas on how to fix the stroke.  I work on my path by  thinking about moving the putter back and forward along the plane.  

4.  Shape and lines don't make the ball go left;  The face pointing left at impact makes the ball go left.   Perhaps you setup closed or the putter overrotates.  I aim right (about 1*) and miss left;  to help correct for the left miss I use a putter with lots of toe hang and minimal offset.  

1 hour ago, PMookie said:


I’ve seen that Malaska video on the parallax, but I never figured out how to do it.
 

Setup a straight line with a ruler or a couple of balls and make sure that they are directly in line with a hole or some kind of target about 6 or so feet away.  Without a putter take your stance and see if the two balls or ruler look like they are in line with the target.  If not,  adjust your stance until it is.  This could require you to move closer/farther from ball,  forward or back, stand more upright or crouch over, tilt your head, lift/lower your head, open/close your stance, etc.   It may not be easy, but once you find the setup that makes everything line up that will be how you should always setup to the ball.  From there you can start to determine the length and lie you would need. 

 

Just like with any other club when you are making a switch you should focus on what you are trying to change with a different putter.   Others would say and I would agree that you shouldn't overthink this.  Hope this helps or gives you some ideas 🙂   Would be much easier to discuss in person.  

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The Iping app and cradle is a handy tool, but very high level and if you want to use analytics to fit a putter I would steer towards SAM or one of the other methods you have used. I think it is a good tool to point you toward some general putter types. 

I used Iping this winter to compare a #9 style odyssey putter (strong arc) with an EVNROLL ER2 (slight arc) and my old gamer - a face balanced mid mallet Taylormade MC72 (straight back and through, which still holds the record for best ever 9 hole performance of 13 putts which led to 3 birdies and a 38).

My usual putting stroke is slight arc but quite close to strong arc. Using the #9 pushed the stroke type right on the line that divides strong and slight arc in the ping app. While using the face balanced putter yielded results that were closer to straight back straight through. So the individual putter can affect these parameters a noticeable amount if you select from opposite ends of the spectrum.

(I had an in person putter fitting, the instructor used the ping app as well as selected an O Works #9 based on my budget and the visual appearance of my stroke on an indoor putting green, i didnt think it was very thorough after hitting maybe 10 balls with 6 different putters and a few more with the 2 or 3 putters i preferred.)

The other things i learned through the Iping app are: the shape of the putter bottom noticeably affected the consistency of my lie angle at address which has some affect on face angle. The EVNROLL had the roundest bottom of the 3. Certain hosel shapes seemed to increase the amount of forward press I defaulted to at address. 

The EVNROLL gave me best average putting handicaps in the app, so i was confident in my choice and put the ER2 into play at the end of last season and beginning of this season after hitting hundreds of putts indoors in random order over a 1-2 month period. I drained a few 20-25 footers with the ER2, including my first eagle which kept me coming back. On a whim (after a 40 putt round with the ER2), I put the #9 in play and my distance control improved which I attribute to better release and freer swing with the #9. Also, the number of putts missed long increased which is better than short in my opinion. The alignment T on the odyssey also fits my eye better than the single line and dots on the ER2. 

How much of this was due to arc type, head weight differences (25-30g) 370g with ER2, grip type and size, alignment lines, etc.?

All putters were 34" and 70 deg lie, the ER2 was eventually adjusted to 68 lie as a result of my fitting in my quest for the ultimate putting machine. Grips used were SS mid slim 3.0, tour snsr pistol 140 and 104, stock EVNROLL red grip. 

At the end of the day, on course performance is the only thing that matters which the Iping numbers cannot tell you. Trying to hit a 50 foot uphill putt with the amount of material milled out of the ER2 face resulted in more of a baseball swing than a putt. This is why I would favor SAM numbers since they are more accurate and you can vary the length of putts to better reflect on course performance then hitting a bunch of the recommended 10 footers with Ping. 

I have since sold the ER2 and in my constant quest to become a bigger ho will now start looking at slant neck putters (#7, other rounded mid mallets) - maybe a stroke lab or an EXO. I can't handle the look or alignment lines of a TM spider even though the statistical side of my brain is telling me to boost the MOI to aid mishits. The Tour SNSR pistol grips are becoming one of my favourite grips in either of the sizes as well. 

TL;DR - Iping can point you towards a putter family or type IMO, you need a fitting for length, loft and lie and would then try to use more sophisticated tools like SAM to see which in that family gives you best stats. On course is likely the only way to determine the head weight and swing weight that will perform and score best not which is best at flat 10 footers. 

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Wow, lots of great info on this subject. CNOSIL nailed so much great info, I won't add much. Even with all the data & tech available, a very good fitter is still a key to putting tips specific to you, while he's using the technology. Obviously, Reading a green is critical, once I found a putter I absolutely have faith in, all I need to know is, do I hit my ball where I intend to hit it.

I found a 48" ruler, just wider than the golf ball, is my final training aid. If I can pick a distance and hit it straight without it falling off that rail, I know I have my face square, and that is what gets me to my target on the green (and in the hole if I picked the correct line + speed).

For $10 with tax included, HD has a 48" that is 2" wide. Then you can downsize to a ruler 1 1/2" wide to hone in the stroke even more.

If you can't hit it 40" off the end, just keep moving the ball on the ruler until you can master a distance, then challenge yourself to the full length of the ruler. Plus, you can clearly see your putting arc in relation to the ruler being a straight edge, and how far back your stroke is. I use the ruler to ensure I hit thru the ball longer than my backswing to ensure I got my ball rolling end over end. 

You can use this indoors with little fanfare for setup with whatever putter or technique you are using.

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As a fitter, I've basically thrown every conceivable training aid and putting system into the dumpster. My suggestion is to try putters either at demo days or a pro shop where they have a REAL GRASS green. Hit everything...mallets, blades, face up, slight arc, heavy arc, different lengths, different grips...until you find a putter you're comfortable holding and swinging. Take an hour or two, not 5 minutes! And a $500 putter is not necessarily better than a $100 or pre-owned model. Years ago I bought an Odyssey #8 White Hot center shaft at a pro shop, made 12 straight putts & it went in my bag. Today, I couldn't make a putt with it if the hole was 12" in diameter. Swings change, bodies change, everything changes and you have to find that perfect putter. Sometimes even a new grip with an older putter changes everything. I currently have an older Odyssey DF Rossie Blade with a new mid-size grip in the bag and the ball seems to be finding the bottom of the cup, at least for now! There is no right or wrong in putting or the equipment, it's just finding your match. Good Luck!

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