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Heavy wedge shafts

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I've been gaming the Cleveland CBX wedges since late June with 95 gram shafts with mixed results. Very erratic in terms of dispersion. To help with a gap in my bag I purchased a 58* CBX with a stock 115 gram DG wedge shaft and the results have been so much better. I reshafted my 50 and 54 with the heavier shaft and again great results.

 

My question is where in the bag should I stop with wedge shafts? PW, 9 iron?

 

Thanks!

 

 

Sent from my iPad using MyGolfSpy

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The first time I played Aldila NV Pro 105 shafts---

 

which became my go-to shaft on several sets when I could still play to an eight--

 

I had  Aldila Lobster Pro 120 shafts on the wedges. 

 

Going NV Pro 105 from driving iron to lob wedge, regardless of clubhead make or model,

 

worked out better for me. 

 

Results have varied for others, but I like the same shaft on everything that takes a .370" tip

and the same shaft on everything that takes a .335" tip. 

 

Whether it's just in my head or not is another story.

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I've been gaming the Cleveland CBX wedges since late June with 95 gram shafts with mixed results. Very erratic in terms of dispersion. To help with a gap in my bag I purchased a 58* CBX with a stock 115 gram DG wedge shaft and the results have been so much better. I reshafted my 50 and 54 with the heavier shaft and again great results.

 

My question is where in the bag should I stop with wedge shafts? PW, 9 iron?

 

Thanks!

 

 

Sent from my iPad using MyGolfSpy

General rule of thumb is to play the same shaft in your irons and wedges. If anything, you can play a half a flex softer in any wedge that you don't take full swings with.

 

Most guys on tour play the same shafts throughout their irons and wedges and some go a half flex softer in the their LW and some even the SW

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That being said, if you are playing lightweight iron shafts and have no issues, but you want to go with a heavier shaft in your wedges, then I'd stop at the gap wedge in and leave my X-PW in the irons shafts.

 

The XP 95 is a good shaft, but definitely a lighter weight.  Unfortunately a fitting is really the only way to tell if you'd benefit from heavier shafts in all of your irons.  But if you are doing fine with the XP 95s in your launchers, then don't mess with what is wroking

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That being said, if you are playing lightweight iron shafts and have no issues, but you want to go with a heavier shaft in your wedges, then I'd stop at the gap wedge in and leave my X-PW in the irons shafts.

 

The XP 95 is a good shaft, but definitely a lighter weight. Unfortunately a fitting is really the only way to tell if you'd benefit from heavier shafts in all of your irons. But if you are doing fine with the XP 95s in your launchers, then don't mess with what is wroking

Thanks, exactly the advice I was looking for.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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On 9/3/2018 at 10:59 AM, jlukes said:

That being said, if you are playing lightweight iron shafts and have no issues, but you want to go with a heavier shaft in your wedges, then I'd stop at the gap wedge in and leave my X-PW in the irons shafts.

 

The XP 95 is a good shaft, but definitely a lighter weight.  Unfortunately a fitting is really the only way to tell if you'd benefit from heavier shafts in all of your irons.  But if you are doing fine with the XP 95s in your launchers, then don't mess with what is wroking

Slight grave digging on this post but...

I'm contemplating changing wedges as the grooves on my 56 are wearing and my 52 doesn't fill the correct gap, and was looking to see if most people play the same shafts in their wedges as their irons. As always, thankful for your knowledge 🙏

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1 hour ago, yungkory said:

Slight grave digging on this post but...

I'm contemplating changing wedges as the grooves on my 56 are wearing and my 52 doesn't fill the correct gap, and was looking to see if most people play the same shafts in their wedges as their irons. As always, thankful for your knowledge 🙏

It's one of those questions that gets asked a lot, but has no definitive answer.

If we take into account the preferrences of the touring professionals, then we tend to see most pros going with a wedge shaft that is softer than their respective iron shafts. Why? Well when you think about it, how many wedge shots are you going to play with the same swing as your irons? The wedge shots in particular around the green which may account for a greater majority played will be by their nature of a delicate touch type shot, or a partial swing or chip or similar. Therefore the same flex as the iron shaft isn't really necessary or conducive to enhanced spin. 

Solution? They use a softer shaft to give better feel and spin. If you take the popular X100 DG shaft played by pros, you will find quite a few players usinfg the slightly softer (and heavier) S400 in their wedges precisely for this reason. 

Like I said it doesn't always work for everyone and preferrences can manifest themselves in many forms, but these trends are the key factors that provide the theory behind the decision to use a softer and/or heavier shaft for the wedges.

As with anything else, try for yourself to see what gives the best results.

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