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How long did it take for you to get "good"?

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11 hours ago, Kanoito said:

If you play off 30, your next goal is 20, then 10... then single... then scratch... why stop there? Let's make it +

For me it's a neverending quest for perfection (same quest for the perfect club) and I'm far far from reaching i

 

 

... You have pretty much described my journey. Finally made it to a + index last year. Of course I want to improve that index now. I started playing at age 30 and found the game pretty easy and pretty difficult at the same time. The problem for most of us is wanting more. I think most could swing within themselves satisfied with decent distance from their tee shots and decent irons shots. But really, who is satisfied with decent? If we drive it relatively straight as a beginner and 220yds why not strive for 240? And of course if we can manage to get to 240, why not 260 ... or more? That is golf for most of us. 

... Perfection is unachievable, but getting as close to perfection on any given shot is the goal. Every golfer is different, with varying physical skills, hand eye coordination, mental toughness and desire. Having a realistic goal for your physical and mental ability is key and some will get better faster than others, but everyone can get better. That's what makes this game so addicting. 

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5 hours ago, CarlH said:

There's always something to work on in the game, be it your full swing, your chipping, or your putting....something is always awry.  And, just when you think that you've "found it" or have reached that "aha moment", golf jumps up and bites you in your arse and says "no, you don't".

I couldn't agree more.  There is always something new that you'll need to work on, I say stay focused on the short game and putting.  I've had +40 putts in one round and 27 the next week.  

Aha moment:  Seeing as how I play to a 19 you probably wouldn't believe me if I told you that less than 2 years ago I shot an Even par 36 on a local 9 hole course.  I thought I had really figured things out, then after a long 6 month lay-off, I went back out and found out that I had developed the shanks, which lead to scores in the 100's and high 90's.  It's getting better now that the shanks are gone, but it's no where close to Even par ("good") again.    

Keep having fun and the "good" will come.  BTW, welcome to the forums, hope you enjoy it as much as I have.

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1 hour ago, PMookie said:

I still feel like I’m not “good” because I can shoot 76 and 91 in subsequent rounds in the city championship. Good would be 76 both days.... I have to big a margin of scoring right now. Frustrating, so I can’t say I’m good... Still!


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Well done! 76 feels like a long ways off for me but looking forward to getting there

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54 years I suppose. I started playing at 10. I've roller-coastered some through the years for various reasons. If I had to pin point one thing that actually improved my game and made me better it was this: Playing with guys that were much better then me. Some of you regulars around here have heard the story before so I won't repeat it in length. Basically, if you are able to find a group of regular players either at a club or muni; get in their game if you can and often. Try and play with the better players as much as possible. This happened to me back in the 80's at a club I joined. I knew a few members so it made things easy for me to get in their game. Each Saturday we'd pair up into foursomes and play a match which mostly consisted of various bets - team and individual. I was fortunate in that about 1/2 of these players were actually very good. Scratch to low single digit caps. Except for a couple of cocky ones these guys were more than willing to offer advice and tips solicited and unsolicited which I gladly accepted. Seemed I always picked up something from these guys. Their style of play was even a lesson to me and which I tried to emulate. To me they seemed to know everything. Over the course of about 2 years my game steadily improved - my hcp. dropped to a upper single digit and I started to become more competitive. Instead of always being "the D" player I was now a B player at times. Golf sure got a lot more fun... and interesting too. I also became one of the guys and had the time of my life. These days I'm playing the most consistent golf ever and I can play with anyone of any ability and enjoy it.

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29 minutes ago, chisag said:

... Perfection is unachievable, but getting as close to perfection on any given shot is the goal. Every golfer is different, with varying physical skills, hand eye coordination, mental toughness and desire. Having a realistic goal for your physical and mental ability is key and some will get better faster than others, but everyone can get better. That's what makes this game so addicting. 

Amen brother!!

This whole discussion is like sitting around the men's locker room after a round. 🏌️‍♂️

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You question is very subjective and I won’t answer the “good” part but the aha moment part.
I was a 90s golfer and was tired of scoring in the 90s so I took some lessons. The lessons changed what I did and my swing became uncomfortable. After a few weeks I went out and s*** a 76. At that aha moment I knew I had the potential to play well I just needed to train myself to play at that level consistently.
Damn, who is your teacher?? I've been taking lessons for two years, and I've definitely improved but not in the 70s yet.
But I remember shooting a 102 when I first started and thinking "Man, I'm good." If I did that today I'd rage quit for a month. It's all relative.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using MyGolfSpy mobile app

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2 hours ago, SeeMore Putts said:

Damn, who is your teacher?? I've been taking lessons for two years, and I've definitely improved but not in the 70s yet.
But I remember shooting a 102 when I first started and thinking "Man, I'm good." If I did that today I'd rage quit for a month. It's all relative.

Sent from my Nexus 6P using MyGolfSpy mobile app
 

Since my first lessons when I was a teenager,  I had a decent swing.   When I started with this particular instructor he asked why I wasn't a better player since I had a good swing.    We worked on come consistency issues and made a few small tweaks and it came together,.   How do you determine potential?   Look at the course you typically play and write down the best score you have had on each hole.  What is that score?  Probably better than you think you can score.  

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Still on my way. Feeling like I'll never get there haha.

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I play to a 11 handicap and I’ll be the first to say I think I’m good. What I mean is I can, by the national average, beat over 74% of amateur golfers. Sure I can shoot 90 but I can go out and shoot 77 (done it 3 times last year) so I know I have the potential. But today I played with a guy that shot 70 (2 under) and wasn’t happy. I’ll never be satisfied where I’m at, and I think most will say the same thing. If you set goals, reach those goals, set new goals, reach them and continue to do that, I think you’re good. Some people will disagree with that logic but who cares. It’s your game and your opinion if you’re “good” or not. Everyone has a different view on good.


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"Good" subject and welcome into the forums from Idaho!

"Good" is what "good" does...(to carve up a famous movie line), so to be "good" is totally relative to the golfer himself and to those around him/her as observers. I'm pretty sure I know a "good" golfer when I see it, and I also think I know when I'm "good" at golfing, which is unfortunately rare but sometimes pops up. In our scramble group, the lines of good and not so good are very clear. Of the 4 of us, we have one clear "good" golfer. He handicaps us sloths by hitting from the tips, giving us "pops" on the harder holes and just generally mops the floor with us. He doesn't keep a handicap, but I'd bet he's 10 or below. He's GOOD! Would I like to be that way? Sure? Do I have the time and drive to hammer-down and become consistently good-er...not yet at this point in my life.

So to answer your root question (finally), I have no frickin' idear…!😜 One of these days, maybe I'll have better experience to answer this question. Until then, I'll plod along as a weekend warrior who is just happy to be out in the open air 2-3 times a month plowing fields and knocking bark off of the random tree.

Glad to have you aboard! Stay engaged and I hope you find your "good" soon 'nuff! Cheers!

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Golf, especially in the beginning, is an exercise of one step forward, two steps back. Then three steps forward, one or more steps back. Rinse, repeat in assorted variations.

Embrace the journey, it'll make the ride all the more enjoyable and satisfying once you reach a semblance of virtual repeatability.

For me, it was probably 4-5 years before I could fairly frequently shoot in the 80's. The possibility for 100+ being ever present, of course.

Tough game, greatest game.

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Welcome to the forum.  I am more than likely not the typical story.  Started playing at age 2 and learned the game left handed as a young child.  When I was 10 I learned to play right handed and still play right handed.  By the time I was 15 years old I was a 1-2 index and shortly thereafter I was a scratch player and have been a scratch to a plus since then and to this day.  The interesting part is that for the most part I was self taught and read a lot of golf magazines as a kid and just played a bunch and hit balls.  To this day most of my practice time is spent playing golf and not beating balls on the range with the exception of the time that I spend rolling putts.  I did break down last season and take my first formal golf lesson at the ripe old age of 42.

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On 4/9/2019 at 11:56 PM, scratchmybirdie said:

This is my first topic on the forum! I started golfing last August with a box set from Amazon and learning from Youtube videos. I first took a series of group lessons, tried out a few coaches, and then I started working weekly with a coach that I felt I clicked with. We've been making some great progress with my ball striking, but sometimes I feel like when we build in more feels or improve something else in the swing, some of the wheels start falling off again and I feel like I'm regressing. It can get quite frustrating. 

I just wanted to find out from some of the more experienced members of the forum how long it took them before they felt "good" at the game. I put "good" in quotes because I'm not really using an objective metric - more wondering about what your own opinions of "good" are and when did you all start feeling confident on the course. Was there an "Aha!" moment that lead to that confidence?

Regression is just part of progression sometimes I'm afraid. I know it can be frustrating, but sometimes you just have to trust that what you're working on will provide the end goal you're looking for. It's not at all uncommon for golfers to struggle with swing changes and hit a lot of awful shots as whatever change being made will likely be outside of their comfort zone initially. It sounds like you're doing everything right, although I would recommend that you invest in a quality (used) set with some input from your instructor - at least if you plan to continue playing for a long time. Box sets are great as an entry-level option to get you started, but they are composed of equipment designed to meet a specific price point rather than to meet specific performance criteria.

As for how long it took me to get "good". Well, I first made my way onto a golf course with my dad at the age of 10. I'm now 32 years old. Having said that, I didn't start putting a lot of effort into golf until about 25. Improvement was very gradual at first, but within the past few years, I've seen the pace of improvement pick up. Not sure why really other than I've spent a lot more time around much better golfers during that time period and began playing more competitive rounds. I still have a ways to go to get where I'd like to be, but I'm confident I can get there - even if I have to enlist some help (instructor, equipment, etc.). Results will always vary depending on available time to practice and whatever base you're working with (athletic vs. non-athletic build, experience in other sports, etc.).

Good luck!

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This is my first topic on the forum! I started golfing last August with a box set from Amazon and learning from Youtube videos. I first took a series of group lessons, tried out a few coaches, and then I started working weekly with a coach that I felt I clicked with. We've been making some great progress with my ball striking, but sometimes I feel like when we build in more feels or improve something else in the swing, some of the wheels start falling off again and I feel like I'm regressing. It can get quite frustrating. 
I just wanted to find out from some of the more experienced members of the forum how long it took them before they felt "good" at the game. I put "good" in quotes because I'm not really using an objective metric - more wondering about what your own opinions of "good" are and when did you all start feeling confident on the course. Was there an "Aha!" moment that lead to that confidence?

6 years. I had flashes before that but didn’t get hold of things till end of senior year in high school. It clicked for me once I got my driver under control and grew into my frame a bit more. Control came with size for me and that was my moment.



In the bag
Driver: Callaway Rogue Subzero 9.5 Stiff flex
3 wood: Callaway Rogue Subzero 15 degree
Hybrids: 17 degree titleist 816 h2
Irons: Ben Hogan Ptx 22-46 degree (4-pw)stiff flex standard lie
Wedges: Callaway Mac Daddy 4 50,54,58 degrees
Putter: Odyssey EXO seven

Gig’em Aggies!
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35 years.. I started playing when I was 12.. I just turned 40 in March.. do the math

the more I practice, the luckier I seem to get..

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Welcome the number one rule of golf is that all aha moments will be followed by periods of what f...

That is true at all levels.

You will know that you are good when you can shoot what you normally shoot during the what the F.... times.

:)


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On 4/11/2019 at 9:05 AM, TR1PTIK said:

Regression is just part of progression sometimes I'm afraid. I know it can be frustrating, but sometimes you just have to trust that what you're working on will provide the end goal you're looking for. It's not at all uncommon for golfers to struggle with swing changes and hit a lot of awful shots as whatever change being made will likely be outside of their comfort zone initially. It sounds like you're doing everything right, although I would recommend that you invest in a quality (used) set with some input from your instructor - at least if you plan to continue playing for a long time. Box sets are great as an entry-level option to get you started, but they are composed of equipment designed to meet a specific price point rather than to meet specific performance criteria.

As for how long it took me to get "good". Well, I first made my way onto a golf course with my dad at the age of 10. I'm now 32 years old. Having said that, I didn't start putting a lot of effort into golf until about 25. Improvement was very gradual at first, but within the past few years, I've seen the pace of improvement pick up. Not sure why really other than I've spent a lot more time around much better golfers during that time period and began playing more competitive rounds. I still have a ways to go to get where I'd like to be, but I'm confident I can get there - even if I have to enlist some help (instructor, equipment, etc.). Results will always vary depending on available time to practice and whatever base you're working with (athletic vs. non-athletic build, experience in other sports, etc.).

Good luck!

Thanks! I actually got fitted for clubs a few months after I started. And now I feel like a gearhead always looking for new thinks to buy. How did you find these much better golfers to play with? Did you join leagues or tournaments?

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Damn, I thought I’d be the only one that said he was waiting for it to happen!!!!

I do love this game!


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I think that, "good" can be a very different thing to different people.  For some, "good" means breaking 100, for others that might mean breaking 90, 80 or 70.

IMO, most of us never really feel that we ever are good at golf.  When people hear that Im a golfer and they ask me if Im good at it, I always tell them that Im just, "OK" and that if I really were any good at it, Id be playing golf for a living instead of working a normal job.

Anyways, to answer your question, it took me probably about 5 years to get where I felt like I knew what I was doing.  Much of it for me was my mental game and learning how to cope with the ups and downs that we all encounter on the course.  I started playing golf when I was in my late teens, so part of that was simply growing up, gaining self confidence and learning that having a bad round of golf isnt that big of a deal.

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Welcome! I think everyone has hit the nail on the head in saying “good” is different for everyone. I would just say that golf, in my opinion, is arguably one of the hardest sports in the world to pick up and get good at. Set yourself small goals so you can have small victories as you continue to learn. I’ve played golf since I was 5 years old, but it wasn’t until I i started working at a course and could play 3-4 times a week that my game took off. With that being said, I know people who never practice and are better than me so it’s different for everyone. Golf is all muscle memory, and luckily for you, you’ve got a coach alongside you to build that muscle memory! Good luck on the golf improvement journey! Enjoy the process.

 

My biggest tip to save yourself strokes no matter what handicap, become a great chipper and putter. Strokes around the green are an EASY way to gain 4,5,6 strokes or lose those strokes. I play with a family friend who shoots mid to high 80s. He’s not a great driver of the ball or iron player, but he’s very good around and on the greens! And you can practice putting in your own home with makes it very achievable! Good luck!

 

 

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