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Myardage

Myardage for iOS - See how the weather and altitude affects your golf shots!

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I'm pleased to announce the immediate availability of our new golf application, Myardage.

What is Myardage?

To put it simply, Myardage is a professional tool for golfers who wish to know how the altitude and weather will affect their carry distances. You enter in how far your golf clubs currently go under a known set of conditions, and then Myardage can calculate how far your clubs will go under a different set of conditions. These conditions can be entered manually, or automatically set by Myardage based on your current location.

How does it work?

Myardage contains a new and unique mathematical engine for calculating golf club distances based on 6 long years of painstaking research and development. This engine is capable of automatically analyzing your golf shots based on your carry distance, the conditions that existed when you shot that distance, and a set of club and launch parameters (defaults are included for all common clubs). By leveraging this proprietary technology, we are able to reverse engineer a set of variables that exist right at the moment the golf club impacts the ball, then calculate how far that shot will go under an entirely different set of environmental conditions.

Why do I need this?

Two reasons:

1) Changes in local weather can affect the distances your golf shots will travel from one day to the next

2) You're traveling to a different city at a different altitude, and you want to know how far your clubs are going to go

Up until now, there has been no definitive way to calculate how the altitude, temperature, barometric pressure, and humidity will affect the carry distance of your golf ball. Myardage completely eliminates all the guesswork associated with determining how the weather will affect your golf shots by calculating this information for you. Devices like a laser rangefinder or a golf oriented GPS watch will tell you how far you've got to get to the hole, but they won't tell you how far your golf ball is actually going to fly.

Features:

• An ultra high precision calculation core that delivers the most precise results possible
• Easy to read, no-nonsense distance display so you always know how far you're going to hit the ball
• 10 different user selectable colors to choose from to organize your bag
• A variety of default club settings to choose from if you're not sure of your own
• Custom club support for those not covered by the included defaults
• Changeable units for temperature, altitude, barometric pressure, and club distances
• Automatic weather and altitude updates on supported devices

Website: http://www.myardage.com
iTunes Store Link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/myardage/id737387946?mt=8
Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCFg4FxNfJDFfyudfKNPBypg
Twitter: https://twitter.com/myardageapp

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Sorry, but this free video talks about air pressure, humidity and temperature.

 

Air pressure and humidity have little affect.

 

Temperature has an effect, and this video gives you a simple rule of thumb to follow

 

https://youtu.be/TbcW6DtjAl0

 

As far as altitude goes, it's just a simple formula with a fixed multiplier.

 

"You can calculate the distance gain you will experience (compared to sea level) by multiplying the elevation (in feet) by .00116. For example, if you're playing in Reno, at 1 mile elevation (5,280 ft.) the increase is about 6% (5,280 x .00116 = 6.1248). If you normally drive the ball 250 yards at sea level, you will likely drive it 265 yards in Reno."

 

https://www.titleist.com/teamtitleist/b/tourblog/archive/2017/03/02/the-effect-of-altitude-on-golf-ball-performance

 

 

 

So while some people who travel and play all of the time might want your app for simplicity, the average consumer, if they really wanted to calculate any changes, could do so for free with about 2 minutes of minimal effort

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7 bucks?! Nah

 

We believe our app is competitively priced for the utility it provides. People invest well over $400 on a laser range finder or a GPS watch all the time. If you can't see the value in something worth the cost of a sleeve of golf balls or a pint at the clubhouse, then you're likely not part of our target demographic.

 

Sorry, but this free video talks about air pressure, humidity and temperature.

 

Air pressure and humidity have little affect.

 

Temperature has an effect, and this video gives you a simple rule of thumb to follow

 

 

As far as altitude goes, it's just a simple formula with a fixed multiplier.

 

"You can calculate the distance gain you will experience (compared to sea level) by multiplying the elevation (in feet) by .00116. For example, if you're playing in Reno, at 1 mile elevation (5,280 ft.) the increase is about 6% (5,280 x .00116 = 6.1248). If you normally drive the ball 250 yards at sea level, you will likely drive it 265 yards in Reno."

 

 

So while some people who travel and play all of the time might want your app for simplicity, the average consumer, if they really wanted to calculate any changes, could do so for free with about 2 minutes of minimal effort

 

All four variables are required to calculate an accurate atmospheric density. Just ask an airplane pilot or a military sniper if the barometer ever factors into their calculations- because it does. Humidity isn't as important as the other three, but the barometric pressure is probably the worst of them. Depending on which direction it swings, you could be seeing distance changes that are the same as a 1000ft change in altitude (or more). How is that not important?

 

As far as everything else goes, it's not just a simple formula. Different clubs create different ball trajectories through the air, which means the atmospheric density of the air affects them differently. Different spin rates cause the ball to behave differently as it soars through the air, which again will change how these variables affect the flight of the golf ball. Our application considers all that internally. It's not just a simple excel spreadsheet with a pretty face- there's some serious math going on behind the scenes to calculate the true effect of the altitude and weather on your carry distances.

 

Here's some numbers I just ran, using the default clubs in our application:

 

Altitude: 0ft

Temperature: 71.6°F

Barometer: 1013 hPa

Humidity: 50%

 

Driver: 260 yards

2 Wood: 220 yards

2 Iron: 195 yards

 

Let's say we drop the barometer to 990 hPa, which isn't uncommon to see when severe weather is rolling in. Here's the new distances:

 

Driver: 261.994 yards (+ 1.994 yard difference)

2 Wood: 221.324 yards (+ 1.324 yard difference)

2 Iron: 196.407 yards (+ 1.407 yard difference)

 

Not much of a difference. Huh. Okay, well, let's crank up the barometer to 1090 hPa.

 

Driver: 253.053 yards (- 6.947 yard difference)

2 Wood: 215.262 yards (- 4.738 yard difference)

2 Iron: 190.148 yards (- 4.852 yard difference)

 

You're losing 7 yards on your driver due to the shift in barometric pressure alone. I'd call that pretty significant. This is roughly the same as a 2500 foot drop in altitude- that is to say, you would experience the same distance loss if you went down 2500 feet. How is that not something that golfers should be considering?

 

Likewise, you can also see how these changes do not affect all clubs equally. Rule of thumbs are just that- a rule of thumb. They're wildly inaccurate as you get further away from the ideal use case, and let's face it- real life is almost never ideal. The altitude, temperature, barometer, and humidity can all combine to in various ways to create situations that a straight linear formula cannot accommodate for. There's more dynamics going on here than anyone previously thought- and our app is the first and only app to successfully calculate these numbers for any conditions you can imagine (quite literally, you can override the automatic weather updates and see how far your clubs would travel at the top of Mount Everest if you really wanted to).

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Where are you getting your science from? Trackman states that barometric pressure has little effect on distance.

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I don't mean to pile on, but this is all I can think of:

golf-funny-meme.jpg

 

 

Amateur golfers are just too unpredictable to worry about an exact yardage. Even pros have unpredictability. If the ball is hit the incorrect distance, that's a swing issue 9/10 times rather than an error in calculation.

 

 

Sent from carrier pigeon using MyGolfSpy

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We believe our app is competitively priced for the utility it provides. People invest well over $400 on a laser range finder or a GPS watch all the time. If you can't see the value in something worth the cost of a sleeve of golf balls or a pint at the clubhouse, then you're likely not part of our target demographic.

 

I guess not but my $400 laser can tell me the distance to the bunker I'm trying to carry. Thankfully I got 2 good eyes and plenty of knowledge that'll let me know if my ball is flying shorter or longer that day. So I'll save that $7 and buy myself a sleeve of balls that I'll get more use out of

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Where are you getting your science from? Trackman states that barometric pressure has little effect on distance.

Our technology is based on a combination of original research, papers published by the USGA, and other sources of information relating to the study of atmospheric science (including topics such as density altitude and atmospheric density in general).

 

Trackman is likely basing their statements off the simple fact that the barometric pressure and temperature often change together. If you've got a heavy storm rolling in, you'll typically see a drop in barometric pressure (increasing the distance of your clubs) followed by a drop in temperature (reducing the distance of your clubs). This can sometimes negate the effect the barometric pressure has on the flight of your golf ball, but not always... It really depends on what the weather is doing, as well as any other geological features that might be nearby (such as mountains or valley).

 

I should also note that things like this really depend on what sort of club you're hitting, and what the flight trajectory of the ball looks like. High spin clubs behave totally differently than low spin clubs, and are affected by the environmental variables in different ways. This is another reason why you can't really apply a standard rule of thumb to everything- not all clubs are the same, so you can't apply the same rules to all of them. We've solved this issue by including a set of default clubs in our application that you can pick from, which include an averaged set of club parameters like the launch angle, loft, spin rate, etc. The averages are good enough for most people, but you can dial in your numbers even more by customizing your clubs and entering in measured data from a device such as a Trackman (which, again, is completely optional). That being said, if you were to create a Driver and a 9 Iron in Myardage and say they both go 200 yards (which I realize is totally unrealistic), you'd see different distance changes for either club. This is because the 9 Iron has a higher spin rate and a different trajectory than a Driver, which in turn alters how much (or little) the environmental variables affect those carry distances.

 

I don't mean to pile on, but this is all I can think of:

 

I would like to point out that it doesn't actually take 6 minutes to get your numbers out of Myardage.

 

Once you've setup your clubs (which is a one time thing for most people), that's it. You're done.

 

Myardage can automatically update the current weather conditions (which is enabled by default), so all you have to do is open the app and wait a few seconds. This entire process takes about 5-10 seconds on a modern day iPhone. We've actually got a demo video of the whole thing right here:

 

 

In this video, I've already setup a few clubs on my iPhone 4S. You don't actually have to enter in anything if you just want to find out what your distances are. You just open the app, wait a few seconds, and then your numbers will automatically update. This isn't something you have to stand around fiddling with- it's designed to be quick and easy to use, especially if you're trying to check it on the tee box.

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I don't mean to pile on, but this is all I can think of:

golf-funny-meme.jpg

 

 

Amateur golfers are just too unpredictable to worry about an exact yardage. Even pros have unpredictability. If the ball is hit the incorrect distance, that's a swing issue 9/10 times rather than an error in calculation.

 

 

Sent from carrier pigeon using MyGolfSpy

Stud makes a great point. The science is great but the human factor will determine the result. Yes with the app I can know whether my 7 iron will go 164 vs. 166 yds. But I don't hit my 7 iron perfectly every time. Is there a place for the app? Yup like like there is a place for premium clubs like PXG.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using MyGolfSpy

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In one of the responses you mentioned target demographic. Who do you believe this is valuable for?

 

As a non competitive golfer while I want to play good golf knowing more than the yardage to a hazard or hole is probably overkill for me. I want to hit fairways and greens. Prior to a round I can laser some shots to see how my distance compares to my baseline.

 

While $7 isn't expensive, I struggle to grasp to long term value add that experience won't give you. If I use slope as an example I learn over time how to pick clubs to compensate for uphill and downhill variations. Until weather conditions start getting to a club or more impact, I probably don't care.

 

If you are targeting the competitive golfer that is playing tournaments, I would think that they would have acquired the basics of the knowledge through experience.

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In one of the responses you mentioned target demographic. Who do you believe this is valuable for?

 

As a non competitive golfer while I want to play good golf knowing more than the yardage to a hazard or hole is probably overkill for me. I want to hit fairways and greens. Prior to a round I can laser some shots to see how my distance compares to my baseline.

 

While $7 isn't expensive, I struggle to grasp to long term value add that experience won't give you. If I use slope as an example I learn over time how to pick clubs to compensate for uphill and downhill variations. Until weather conditions start getting to a club or more impact, I probably don't care.

 

If you are targeting the competitive golfer that is playing tournaments, I would think that they would have acquired the basics of the knowledge through experience.

 

I don't entirely mean to answer your question with a question- but if you want to hit a green, don't you need to know how far your clubs are going to carry? If you laser your shot and it says 220 yards, wouldn't you want to pick the club that carries 220 yards? What if 200 lands you in a bunker, and 240 puts you in a pond?

 

That's who our app is for. Your carry distances are linked to your altitude and weather, and our app totally eliminates all the guesswork associated with that. There's so much technology out there that tells you the distance to the hole, but there's nothing out there that tells you how far your clubs are going to carry. That's exactly what our application is designed to do.

 

So I'd say it's valuable to anyone who wants to see how the environment is constantly affecting their game from one day to the next, or anyone who constantly travels to new golf courses (as altitude is one of the major things we use in our calculations).

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I don't entirely mean to answer your question with a question- but if you want to hit a green, don't you need to know how far your clubs are going to carry? If you laser your shot and it says 220 yards, wouldn't you want to pick the club that carries 220 yards? What if 200 lands you in a bunker, and 240 puts you in a pond?

 

That's who our app is for. Your carry distances are linked to your altitude and weather, and our app totally eliminates all the guesswork associated with that. There's so much technology out there that tells you the distance to the hole, but there's nothing out there that tells you how far your clubs are going to carry. That's exactly what our application is designed to do.

 

So I'd say it's valuable to anyone who wants to see how the environment is constantly affecting their game from one day to the next, or anyone who constantly travels to new golf courses (as altitude is one of the major things we use in our calculations).

And my follow up is that unless my 220 club is losing 20 yards as you indicated I am probably ok hitting my stock 220 club. My chances are greater that I will mishit vs my knowing that my club is traveling 20 yards less today than yesterday.

 

My feedback is that the app is a cool toy, but probably doesn't have a long term value add for the average recreational golfer. For competitive golfers, I think their experience will be able to provide a generality on how the days weather will impact their shot distance. You app plays into the analytical nature of a person and not the feel aspect. You target market seems to be the highly analytical competitive player; similar to a Bryson Dechambeau.

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We don't normally do this, but since you guys seem to be on the fence about the app...

 

Here's five promo codes that you can redeem to download free copy.

 

H3R7EMHY636R
A9Y4FMEHWTJJ

TEYPL4RWMTEX
XKPRY6R4W7LR
ETL4NM6FRNRK

 

We don't have any in-app purchases, subscriptions, or other hidden costs. What you see is what you get. This is for the full version (which normally sells for $6.99) and includes free weather updates for life.

 

If you're curious to see what it's all about, grab a promo code and give it a shot. Maybe you find it useful, maybe not. I would ask that if you redeem a code, you reply with the code you've used so I can strike it off the list (since there's no way for me to tell which codes have been redeemed on my end).

 

You can redeem these codes through iTunes or on your iPhone/iPad. On iTunes, there's a "Redeem" link on the right hand side of the "iTunes Store" section where you can enter in a promo code. On iOS, you can open the app store app, then scroll to the very bottom of the first page- you'll see a redeem button you can tap to bring up a screen where you can enter in the code.

 

PS: We're obviously not expecting anything for these. They're strictly for you guys to download and mess around with, if you want.

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Thanks for the codes. I am going to pass; as I mentioned I don't think I would see any appreciable value in the app so I will leave the codes for someone that believes they would benefit.

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I have a couple thoughts here.

 

First off, welcome to the forum.  We can get passionate about golf stuff, but I like to think we keep an open mind too.  Personally if weather conditions are affecting my clubs by upwards of 5+ yards thats enough that I would like to know about it.  I think you've done a great job defending your app.

 

For the price of the app, yes $7 is expensive....for an app.  It takes it out of the "impulse buy" category put it squarely in the category of something I need to find real value in to consider purchasing.  Have you considered a "lite" version that someone could download as a test to see if they find value?  In the grand scheme of things though it's only $7.  I know I've wasted more than that on apps I've still never used (I'm looking at you shot tracer app)

 

I think this would be really cool to use as the temperatures get colder in spring and fall.  I always have a guess as to how much cold affects my golf ball, but this could give me a better answer.

 

A couple of app questions as well.

 

Can app give distances based on wind conditions?  I would think wind plays a much bigger part in overall distance than any other variable.

 

Is this USGA legal?

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OK, I used this code.  ETL4NM6FRNRK

 

The more I think about it, the more I think it could be kind of cool.

 

If I'm thinking of this correctly this is how I plan on using it.  I input all my stock distances of my clubs in the app.  Then as I'm pulling up to the first tee I can just pull up the app and it will automatically detect the current weather conditions and give me adjusted carry distances based on current conditions.  Then before I even tee off I'll know if my clubs are going stock, a little further or a little shorter today.

 

If it's only a yard or two I just don't worry about it.  But say it's only 50 degree's out and my clubs are 5 yards shorter I'll know before I even tee off to play an extra half club on approach shots.  Or if it's 85 and sunny I'll know they are going to fly almost a half club farther.

 

I could see a huge benefit in knowing how my yardages are going to be affected before I even tee off.

 

How is that NOT a cool thing to know?

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How is that NOT a cool thing to know?

I think I acknowledged it was a cool thing to know. I just believe that experience of playing in different conditions gives me that knowledge just like slope and wind adjustments.

 

Eager to hear your shirt and long term thoughts.

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I have a couple thoughts here.

 

First off, welcome to the forum.  We can get passionate about golf stuff, but I like to think we keep an open mind too.  Personally if weather conditions are affecting my clubs by upwards of 5+ yards thats enough that I would like to know about it.  I think you've done a great job defending your app.

 

For the price of the app, yes $8 is expensive....for an app.  It takes it out of the "impulse buy" category put it squarely in the category of something I need to find real value in to consider purchasing.  Have you considered a "lite" version that someone could download as a test to see if they find value?  In the grand scheme of things though it's only $8.  I know I've wasted more than that on apps I've still never used (I'm looking at you shot tracer app)

 

I think this would be really cool to use as the temperatures get colder in spring and fall.  I always have a guess as to how much cold affects my golf ball, but this could give me a better answer.

 

A couple of app questions as well.

 

Can app give distances based on wind conditions?  I would think wind plays a much bigger part in overall distance than any other variable.

 

Is this USGA legal?

 

Thanks for your comments!

 

We have considered a "lite" version, but we're not really sure how to go about that at the moment. If we submit a separate application, then there's no way for users who download that version to transfer their clubs to the full version, should they chose to purchase a copy. We could restrict the version we've already got and have the user unlock additional features via IAP, but we didn't want to charge our users anything past the initial price- there's too many iOS apps out there with "strings attached", and we didn't want to be one of those guys.

 

Unfortunately we don't support distances based on wind conditions. It was something we were looking into at one point in time, but I could never find a real time source of data that was fast enough or accurate enough to generate any sort of usable information. Out here, our wind is often very violent and unpredictable. It rises and swells, then cuts out, then blasts you a few seconds later. It didn't seem like anything I could practically predict or model, so we made the decision to forgo that and focus on the stuff relating to atmospheric density instead.

 

We don't know if it's USGA legal. Their rules allow the use of internet based weather services, but disallow anything that might give you a local "reading" from the device itself. The specific example they give of this is an anemometer for measuring wind speeds, but they don't mention using the GPS receiver to ascertain the phone's current location for weather updates. At the same time, a lot of weather related applications use the GPS to hone in on your current location for more accurate weather readings, and they specifically state that "weather related applications" are allowed- so it could very well be legal.

 

I've sent an email to them requesting verification on those rules, and asking them if they think our system is legal or not. I'll post an update here if I hear back.

 

OK, I used this code. ETL4NM6FRNRK

 

The more I think about it, the more I think it could be kind of cool.

 

If I'm thinking of this correctly this is how I plan on using it. I input all my stock distances of my clubs in the app. Then as I'm pulling up to the first tee I can just pull up the app and it will automatically detect the current weather conditions and give me adjusted carry distances based on current conditions. Then before I even tee off I'll know if my clubs are going stock, a little further or a little shorter today.

 

If it's only a yard or two I just don't worry about it. But say it's only 50 degree's out and my clubs are 5 yards shorter I'll know before I even tee off to play an extra half club on approach shots. Or if it's 85 and sunny I'll know they are going to fly almost a half club farther.

 

I could see a huge benefit in knowing how my yardages are going to be affected before I even tee off.

 

How is that NOT a cool thing to know?

 

That's exactly how it works.

 

Once you've put in your stock distances, you need to set the "previous conditions" to the weather conditions that best represent the conditions that existed when you shot those distances. For example, if you know your driver goes 260 yards on a warm summer day, then that's what you need to set the previous conditions to.

 

After that's done, the app will automatically update the current conditions whenever it can, and automatically recalculate your numbers for you.

 

Note that you can actually override any of the current conditions to whatever you want... If the app auto-updates the weather and says the ambient temperature is 22°C, you can go in and edit that value to whatever you want, just to see how changing that value will affect your numbers. If you want to revert back to the automatically updated value, you can tap on the "unlock" button that shows up next to an overridden value, and it'll switch back to the automatic value. The app will also clear out any values you've overridden after 12 hours, just so you don't accidentally forget about them.

 

We've found that a lot of people actually have a lot of fun just sitting around fiddling with the current conditions- because you can find out how far your clubs are going to go in London, or Amsterdam, Florida, California, etc. You can also push the numbers pretty far in either direction and do some silly stuff like seeing how far your clubs would go at the top of Mount Everest. I don't know how practical that information would be, but our calculation core is robust enough that the results should be reasonably accurate.

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This does sound very intriguing. I think the pro's would benefit from this greatly. They are so precise they need info like this. I can see a lot of guys using this during practice rounds at the Masters!

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using MyGolfSpy

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Used:  XKPRY6R4W7LR

I will let you know how things work after I have some time to look at the app. 

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